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Tuesday, 4 March 2008
Idea Creation
Topic: Writing Ramblings

Today I have an idea creation challenge for everyone!!!  I want you to go to your bookshelf and choose a book.  Got it?  Okay, now turn to page 123 and, starting with the first full sentence, count down until you reach sentence 5.  Now...write down sentences 5, 6 and 7.

 You obviously know the context of the sentences, but view them as someone who did not know their origin would.  What scenarious can you come up with?

As an example, I chose my own book, Storm. The 5, 6 and 7th sentences on page 123 are:

"Storm could see the mixture of wanting to believe him and feel comforted, yet the fear of being hurt was so strong.  She pulled back and Storm didn't force the issue.  She was like a wild animal that had been captured and tortured."

What scenarios do I see wih this? Let's look at the she:

a.  a  woman  (Was she raped. beaten or just heartbroken?  Is she a war victim? A homeless woman?  A victim of an auto accident or natural disaster?)

b.  a child (Is she lost?  Has she been abused? Is she hurt?  Was she raised by jungle animals?)

c.  a  animal (an orphaned bear?  a lost dog?  a feral cat? Was she hit by a car?  Found in a cave? In a pet store?)

The possibilities are endless.  Let your mind ask questions about these sentences.  Allow it to form a story.

I would love to see the passages each of you chose.  Please leave me a comment.  Maybe your comment will light another's creativity.  Maybe theirs will strike a spark in you!!!

 


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:47 AM EST
Post Comment | View Comments (5) | Permalink

Tuesday, 4 March 2008 - 6:36 AM EST

Name: "Ron Berry"
Home Page: http://here-it-is.tripod.com

As everyone knows, I'm just a simple country boy. So I selected 'Five Equations that Changed the World.

"They had done so, however, at the expense of the working classes, who now found themselves being exploited or dismissed by employers who were using the newfangled machinery as a way to get rich quickly. Even for James and Margaret Faraday, who lived in the countryside, far from England's growing industrial centers, this coup de main was hitting close to home. Ever since childhood, James had labored long and hard to become a consummate blacksmith; now, though, his superbly wrought handiworkds were being steadily devalued by the increasing availability of machine-made products."

 Ever wonder about technology? The Luddites did and fought it tooth and nail. Unfortunately, progress was inevitable. How Faraday recovered is an equation that requires some special characters (I'll spell them out in brackets).

[delta (lowercase] * E = [delta (uppercase]B/[delta(uppercase)]t

In other words, the law of electromagnetic induction. If anyone wants to learn a bit more about it, contact me and I'll try to make it understandable. What it meant, in a nutshell, to the Faraday's is that the industrial revolution was destroying his profits in his primary business but that put him in a position to greatly aid in the progression of that very revolution. It's almost a reverse catch-22.

 The answer to the formual? Writing equals Inspiratation times perspiration

Tuesday, 4 March 2008 - 9:11 AM EST

Name: "Teri B. Clark"
Home Page: http://www.teribclark.com

 I Used to Think People My Age Were Old by Kathleen "Casey" Null

Do accept that the middle-ager doesn't feel compelled to hide her age or accomplishemnts and doesn't feel it's the eighth wonder of the world that she has grown children. She does feel it is a stage she has achieved after much hard work, late nights, and countless tears and prayers. Don't say to the middle-ager, "You look pretty good for someone your age."

 

I immediately see a woman that I would now consider young (in relation to where I hope to get) with this very annoyed face. She is proud to shout out her age and doesn't understand why people look so shocked by it!

"Is is that "I" have grown children...or children at all? Goodness. Are they suggesting that I shouldn't have ever been a mom? Or that my mothering skills are so poor that it is amazing my children lived to adulthood?

"Or perhaps they are suggesting that I began a family when I was too young?  Maybe a mere 13 when I had my first?"

And then there is the line about looking good for your age. "Hmmph. Does this mean that I if looked just like this and were 10 years younger that I would look bad? That they are just giving me extra points for my looks based on my age?"

It is no wonder she has an annoyed face! 

 

 

 

Tuesday, 4 March 2008 - 10:19 AM EST

Name: "Billie A Williams"
Home Page: http://www.billiewilliams.com

Great idea Joyce,

I haven't got time to try this right now but I'm going to -- what an excellent prompt. I love it!  I have used everything from a spider crawling down my windshield to a bird landing on my window sill for story forwarding techiniques while I'm writing. It's amazing what you will find fits into your current WIP (works in progress) if you just write and let it flow.

Thank you - I'll let you know what I get.

Billie 

Tuesday, 4 March 2008 - 2:37 PM EST

Name: "Pee Wee"
Home Page: http://willow-walk.tripod.com

Joyce, I also used my book, page 123, for an example. This is my take on how this exercise is helpful to me.

From The Kahills of Willow Walk - Page 123

Her mama's voice rang in her ears, clear as crystal and full o0f devotion. Love can be wondrous--but it can also break your heart. Be cautious, Kat, not to love too easily or too soon.

1.  Instead of Mama's voice:  Could be any ones voice from your doctor to your dentist to you sweetheart to your father or whomever.

I'm just ging to do an example of a sentence instead of trying to list the many prompts these sentences inspire.  

His Papa's brooding eyes stung his heart with disturst and doubt. Leave loving alone, it isn't worth the time of day, son, he had said. Never give in to believing someone is honest and forthright when they say, I love you. (Now isn't that sad coming from a father?)

 This is the best way I know how to explain how many ideas can be derived from one word or one sentence. Helps with finding plots, sub plots, characters and many other things.

This is a good exercise, Joyce. 

 Pee Wee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, 4 March 2008 - 3:33 PM EST

Name: "Joyce Scarbrough"
Home Page: http://www.authorsden.com/joycelscarbrough1

From page 123 of my second book, DIFFERENT ROADS:

Jaycee put her hands on her hips. "Let me guess. You're getting me a T-shirt with your picture on it. No--a life-sized portrait of you for my wallet."

"Nope," he said, "I'm getting you a cast iron chastity belt and keeping the only key."

Okay, run with that, folks! ;-)

 

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