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Thursday, 23 October 2008
The Forbidden Daughter by -Shobhan Bantwal-A Review
Topic: Book Review

When Isha finds out the baby she is carrying is a girl, she fears the reaction of her in-laws.  Girl children are not acceptable in their eyes, or that of the doctor, who suggests she have an abortion rather than give birth to the a second female child.  When Isha refuses, she has little idea just how drastically her life is about to change. Just how far will some people go to see that Isha does not "disgrace" her in-laws name? Who all is involved and why has nothing been done to stop the selective abortions that are taking place regularly?  Can Isha make it on her own?  Will her efforts to expose the truth result in her losing everything she lives for?  Who can she trust with her secret, life and heart?

Shobhan Bantwal takes her readers into a world most of us can't even imagine.  I continually had to remind myself that this story was not taking place in some long ago dark age, but instead in modern times.  It tore at my heart to know that in some parts of the world, female children are still considered unwelcome--to the point of actually being killed rather than loved and cherished as they should be.

It is obvious that Shoban Bantwal knows her subject and the country of which she writes.  She doesn't pad the pages with a lot of fluff, but instead uses every word to draw her reader in--and make them care for her characters.  The only thing that kept me from reading this book in one sitting was my eyes giving out--but I found myself dreaming of the characters.  Before I finished, I had not only cried, but  found myself angry and wishing I knew how to stop this archaic practice.

You can't read The Forbidden Daughter with no emotion.  It is considered women's fiction, but I would suggest any man who cares also read it--he won't be disappointed by the depth explored by Ms. Bantwal.  I can see this book being made into a movie.


Posted by joyceanthony at 5:57 AM EDT
Post Comment | View Comments (5) | Permalink

Thursday, 23 October 2008 - 7:54 AM EDT

Name: "Ron Berry"
Home Page: http://unwriter1.wordpress.com

I don't have to read the book to get angry at the archaic practice, I already am. I don't know if I could read it. My views on how women are treated everywhere would make it just a bit too emotional for me. India and Africa have some extreme views that must be exposed to the world! I'm glad to see this book written for that reason.

Why are females discriminated against? Biblical reasons? Nothing about this makes sense. It's enough to make me disown my gender because there is no way in hell that the male is superior to the female, none! Just the thought of this mistreatment angers me.

Thursday, 23 October 2008 - 8:18 AM EDT

Name: "Marvin D Wilson"
Home Page: http://inspiritandtruths.blogspot.com/

Sigh. sad but true, the age-old discrimination against beings of the feamle gender. And we ALL owe our very lives to those precious beings who carry us in their wombs give birth to us and nuture us with their love. What despicable creatures men have been over the ages.

Thursday, 23 October 2008 - 8:28 AM EDT

Name: "Beka"
Home Page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/newwrion

I don't know what your opinion is but I am against abortion anywhere. I feel our own country has encouraged even worse slaughter, not just daughters but any unwanted child. With a society growing more and more anti-child how can we be a people of integrity and compassion?

Did you know people in our country spend more combined on their pets than we spend combined on our children? Pets don't need babysitting, quality time, school, clothes, transportation to events, a house, relatives and so on. Why wouldn't a nation where our material demands equal most husbands/wives both required to work away from home?

Women't rights? They begin with the rights of unborn women to life as God has given. They continue with a woman's right to the respect of, support of and potential for motherhood. They continue on in line with a woman's right to pursue the required support of children, whether by marital partnership, including choice for the father to parent, choice for loving relatives to assist parenting, choice for loving and relating non-family members to parent or by wise/prudent/and the minimum required working away from home.

 Well off my band wagon!

Becky

Thursday, 23 October 2008 - 8:35 AM EDT

Name: "Beka"
Home Page: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/newwrion

Made a mistake above - In that final sentence of 3rd paragraph I meant to go on  with "we easily could become a nation that picks and chooses who can live, including girls"

Last paragraph last line I meant to say the right to working is a very distant 4th compared to the first 3. Too many women's rights groups have it backwards . . .

Thursday, 23 October 2008 - 4:21 PM EDT

Name: "avocado99"
Home Page: http://avocado99.wordpress.com

Aren't the mothers-in-law in on this cruel practice? 

 You can't blame this on men, entirely.

Daughters are precious, loving, and women are just

 as valuable as men and capable of great things in life.

Anyone who would stop a life just on the basis of gender

is despicable. But, unfortunately, some women go along

with this barbarism.

 

 

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