Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Blog Tools
Edit your Blog
Build a Blog
RSS Feed
View Profile
« January 2008 »
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31
You are not logged in. Log in
Entries by Topic
All topics  «
Author Interview
Blog Tours
Book Review
Book Trailers
Character Interviews
First Chapter
Miscellaneous
Writing Ramblings
Books and Authors
Tuesday, 29 January 2008
Getting to Know Tim Young
Tim Young the person:

1.  What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Caring, Funny, Sensitive

2.     How do you think others would describe you?

Caring, Funny, Intense

3.    Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

Music

4.     Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.

No

5.     What is your most precious memory?

Being at the summit of Alta in Salt Lake City the morning after a 2 ½ foot snow storm

6.   What is your most embarrassing memory?

Addressing my high school prom date by her sister's name

7.     If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

Writing/Playing music

8.     In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

 Here lies Tim Young, he's finally settled down.  While we always marveled at his uncanny ability to jack up low percentage shots on the basketball court (year after year) - we realize that he never gave up hope that they would actually go in.

 May he reunite with the friends (both 4-legged and 2-legged) that brought him so much joy on this plane, and may we all smile just a little when we think of him.

Tim Young the writer:

9.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

My first book came as a result of a 5-hour creative purge wherein I could not write everything down fast enough as it burst from my mind.  I knew then that my life would never be the same, providing I could ways to tap into that creative river again...

10. What is going on with your writing these days?

As I type, nothing.  I am working 90-100 per week and horribly out of balance.  This is part and parcel of paying the price (literally) for my creative endeavors.

11. What are your future goals for your writing?

To publish one book every February

12.  Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

Nothing is really typical.  I try to keep my antennae up and write things down when they come to me.  I listen to music at a low volume when I feel that all the ideas are "out" and it's time to put things into a form or shape.  Stream of consciousness and then organization/clarity/focus.

13. Why do you write?

I write because I enjoy it and enjoy when others enjoy what I do.

14. What writer most inspires you?  Why?

Impossible to narrow it down to one.  John Irving, Maya Angelou, Stephen king (for the pleasure he quite obviously takes in his twisted thoughts)

15. How do you define your writing?

I write children's books about dogs.  When I think of dogs, I think of children.  It all works in my head.

16. In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

That my work was clever, imaginative, funny & warm.

Tim Young the details:

17. Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

www.MurphysBone.com

18. Is there a place where readers can reach you?

www.MurphysBone.com

19. Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

Murphy's Safety Songs Safety Tips for Tots and "Spots"

Champion Sleeper! Saving His Family, One Snooze at a Time

20. For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

Murphy's Safety Songs - Dog care and safety through music and art

Champion Sleeper! - Fun, silliness and love!

In conclusion:

21. Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

I think my work is what it is.  It's hard to describe the joy of my particular creative process.  I am fortunate to work with great people (Illustrator Tom Price and Editor Jill Ronsley, Musician John Nooney) and a small but dedicated peer group.  I do what I do because I can't imagine NOT creating.  I am only sorry that I didn't find this part of me earlier in life...


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Tuesday, 29 January 2008 12:03 AM EST
Post Comment | Permalink
Monday, 28 January 2008
Getting to Know Lea Schizas
Topic: Author Interview
Lea Schizas the person

1.  What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Generous, tenacious, optimistic

2.  How do you think others would describe you?

Never thought of this before but most likely: writeaholic, generous, straightforward

3.  Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

My family, no question about it. Their woes, their accomplishments, anything to do with my husband and children comes before anything else.

4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.

Yes, my two year old Daisy...or as we refer to her, "Crazy Daisy". There's a really neat story behind her and one after you read will understand why Daisy is more than a pet to us.

I happened to go on a Thursday night with my little one to the pet shop for a visit, not to buy because my little one had a tremendous fear of animals. But more of a ‘see, animals are nice' type of a trip. Anyway, I spotted Daisy in the cage and fell in love with her right off. Now the only thing I had to do was somehow convince my little one to try to open her mind in allowing a pet in the house. (Daisy is a mix of Shih Tsu and Llasa Apso) My daughter said she would give it her best shot so the deal was she would be alone with me and the puppy in a backroom in the pet shop. This was for me to see her reaction. Well, she jumped so fast on the bench the owner took the puppy back and I took my daughter home. As soon as we got home, she started crying.

"Why are you crying? Because we didn't buy the puppy?"

"No, mom, because I didn't try to be brave."

Well, my heart melted and after she said yes to give it another go we went back to the pet store. I almost cried when I saw the SOLD sign on Daisy's cage. We were leaving when I decided at the last minute to ask the owner to please call the people who placed a deposit on her to see if they really wanted her. Turned out it was a mistake. They had placed the SOLD sign on the wrong cage. We went home with Daisy that very night and my daughter's fear of animals went away in about three months.

But that's not the end of Daisy's story. After four days of owning her, she came down with pneumonia, ended up in the hospital in an oxygen tank for a week. My three hundred dollar puppy now cost us three thousand in hospital fees...but you know what, we wouldn't have done it any other way. Amongst our family and friends pleas to put her down, we wanted to give her a chance and boy are we thrilled we did cos she's one energetic dog, full of love.

5.  What is your most precious memory?

This may sound odd, and I'm not an odd person but the most precious memory is when my mom fell halfway into a sewer. That had to be the highlight of my life. To better understand: I was thirteen at the time and my parents and I were coming back from a dance. Mom kept badgering me about tearing my nylons. She's Greek, don't ask. Anyway, I get out on the driver's side the same time like my dad. Then all we heard is, "George! George! Help me!" We ran to the sidewalk and what did we see? Mom hanging on the sides for dear life. As a youngster the first thing that popped into my head was, "Mom, I hope you didn't tear your nylons." Yep, she was a bit annoyed at that to say the least.

6.  What is your most embarrassing memory?

When I was in junior high school. Mom had purchased these overalls for me, which were nice and all but way too small. Now if you only knew my mom you'd understand that if she believed her baby looked nice in them there was nothing on this earth that would change her mind. So I was ‘forced' to wear them to school. Those overalls kept riding me all through first period so I decided to wear my coat (winter season) for the rest of the day. Principal stops me as I was going to my locker, thinking I was getting ready to skip school and asks me to follow him to the office. I did, he asks me where I think I was going, and the first thing that came to my mind is what came out of my mouth, "Nowhere, sir, but I got my period and my pants are all bloody. That's why I'm wearing my coat." Come to think of it, not sure if he was more embarrassed or me having to say ‘period' to my principal.

7.  If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

As a child I always wanted to be a teacher. I would line up my Barbie dolls and stuffed animals as my students. I even made an attendance list. Now, to clarify, my dolls never talked to me. They were the perfect classroom setting.

8.  In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

the writer: Lea Schizas lived and gave her all in her lifetime the way I am sure she'll be doing wherever her journey now takes her. Sorry, that's about it. Kinda creepy.

Lea Schizas the Writer

9.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

Oh, yes, as though it was yesterday. I was in sixth grade and had entered a writing contest. I stood in front of the class, read my four-page horror tale, all the while thinking my teacher was going to be upset with me because everyone's stories were about animals, and lovey dovey things and here I was scaring the beegeebees out of everyone. Anyway, the time came for the class to vote and guess what, I must have scared them to vote for me subliminally because I was the first prize winner. My prize- a bundle of books.

10.  What is going on with your writing these days?

Plenty. I recently got an agent who in turn, in a fast turnaround timeframe, got me a contract with a publisher for a three book children's picture book series, The Robbie and Katie Adventure Series. We're starting with three books and then build from there.

I've completed my middle grade chapter book, and have reached the mid-sections in four other novels. Now this might now seem a lot to some but for me, with everything else I have going on in my writing career, this is a huge step forward.

11.  What are your future goals for your writing?

I'm so happy you mention ‘goals' in this interview. I always have a five-year goal chart I try to achieve. So far, the first five-year goals have been achieved and surpassed my expectations. They were mainly to get a name for myself. Now, my goals are to write, write, write my own stuff, promote my stuff, and try to pull back a bit of my energy and time promoting others. As much as I love doing that I would love to have more of my own writing in the forefront.

12.  Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

Let me give you the short end of it otherwise we'll be here all day. I'm a fulltime writer/editor now so my laptop charges up at 6:30am and never closes before midnight. Each day is devoted to one area: my sites, my newsletters, emails, promo...but everyday always has me writing my stories/articles and editing for publishers. These two things are my everyday MUST DO things and the rest are divided to work on various days of the week.

13.  Why do you write?

To escape. Love my family, love my life, but writing is a passion to become someone other than the mom of five children. It's nice being their chauffeur, their bank, their nurse, their cook- but I'd now like to be a teen who has visions of murders, a young girl who finds out she's a princess to this new world she never knew existed, a vampire with a mission, an alien warrior who faces charges of treason. Come on, who else other than a writer can experience these things and not be locked up in a nuthouse.


14.  What writer most inspires you?  Why?

I read a lot of various writers, love each of their writing voices but can't really say any of them inspired me since I've always written from a young child. If anything, I would say it was the Archie comic books that first grabbed my attention and inspired me to write. But as an adult, if I would have to choose, then it would be J. K. Rowling for her backstory and how her determination finally worked for her. This applies to Stephen King, the master of rejection letters plastered all over his walls. Both of these writers offered me the true impression of what it means to ‘never give up'.

15.  How do you define your writing?

I don't write purple prose, long descriptive details. I begin with action, end all chapters with cliffhangers. I write to entertain, to awaken the reader's emotions, to bring them into my penned world. If anything, I would compare my writing to Dean Koontz-straight forward, short sentences, no elaborate descriptive details to add word count, just give you the story.

16.  In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

After all these years, her books continue to be read by many.

Lea Schizas the Details

17.  Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

My website contains all the links to anything and everything I'm involved with:

http://leaschizaseditor.com/ 

The Writing Jungle: http://thewritingjungle.blogspot.com/

Branches of Life: http://brancesoflife.blogspot.com/

18.  Is there a place where readers can reach you?

Those who know me know I'm always on email mode and can be reached at:

museitupeditor@yahoo.ca

19.  Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

*The Rock of Realm -YA fantasy adventure by Lea Schizas (Amazon and all major online bookstores)

*Doorman's Creek - Paranormal suspense/thriller http://www.etreasurespublishing.com/Lea_Schizas/doormans-creek.htm

*The Muse On Writing - nonfiction writers how-to book-co-authored and edited by Lea Schizas

http://www.freewebs.com/themuseonwriting

*Aleatory's Junction - fantasy anthology-co-authored and edited by Lea Schizas

http://aleatorysjunction.tripod.com/

20.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

They can expect entertainment, a connection to the characters, and a sense of being there riding the adventure of highs and lows.

In conclusion:

21.  Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

I'm a dedicated writer who never stops learning her craft. There is so much in the writing business to absorb that I believe I would be a fool to say I knew it all. What I do know is what I want to offer to my readers- books that will allow them to escape, even for just a little while, and give them a chance to realize what I meant above when I wrote "I become a teen with visions of murders, an alien warrior facing charges of treason..." When a writer connects his reader to his fictional character, there is no greater satisfaction.


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Monday, 28 January 2008 12:28 AM EST
Post Comment | View Comments (1) | Permalink
Sunday, 27 January 2008
Getting to Know Susie Hawes
Topic: Author Interview
Susie Hawes the person:

1.  What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Optimistic, intense, moody.

2.  How do you think others would describe you?

Cheerful, enthusiastic. I've been told this repeatedly.

3.   Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

My family; home schooling. I love the freedom home schooling affords us. I have a great family and love spending time with them, and the school system in my home town sucks. By downloading state and federal goals and basic guidelines I can provide the kids with a serious education and still give them the freedom to explore.

4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.

We have three dogs and a cat. Meet Blaze, the resident feline. The male, a small tom with a big cat attitude. He's scarred and sassy; with all the fights he's been in, we were forced to keep him indoors for quite a time. He finally learned to avoid fights, but it took a while.

Next is Melissa. She's mostly Labrador retriever; a big, lovable lady. Very playful, too. She is the queen of the house, and a big favorite with the other two girls. 

Then we have Tilly. Blind in one eye, she is a special lady. Tilly is a small dog built along the lines of a whippet or greyhound. She's shy and loving, but a bit temperamental. She needs a gentle touch and a lot of love to shine. My husband loves her like a child.

My baby girl is Pudge. She's got the look of a mix breed, part pit bull, part lab, and is a small thing. Her dad was small; her mom was a pit. She's perpetually curious and playful, very hyper at times and always loving and ornery. She's my little chow hound and it's a challenge to keep her at a healthy weight. I have to keep the food bowl up or she'll make herself sick. One ear is permanently cocked up and one is down, and she's always got a startled look, except when she's chewing on you.

Pudge and Tilly look at Melissa as a mother figure and love the cat, who ignores them with feline distaste, but sleeps cuddled up to them often.

5.  What is your most precious memory?

I know it's cliché, but the first time I saw my kids' eyes open.

Right up there is the wedding. My husband and I were married by a Justice of the Peace in his office. Rick has a bad stutter, and massacred the vows. The Judge kept looking over at me nervously, but I had known for a long time how Rick's speech patterns were. I just told him to take his time and encouraged him, then smiled at the Judge.

I guess the Judge expected me to get angry, because he looked relieved. I knew the stuttering meant Rick took the vows seriously; they meant something very important to him, or his stutter wouldn't have been so bad.

The Judge wouldn't take any money from us after the wedding. He said he was glad to have been the one to marry us.

6.  What is your most embarrassing memory?

Oh, god, I have a lot of them. I'm mildly dyslexic, and make mistakes a lot. I guess it would have to be the time I misjudged the distance and walked right into a chip rack, almost knocking it over. I wasn't drunk, but it happened early on a Saturday morning, about the time the bars let out, in a convenience store. Right in front of the check out counter. The clerk made a drunk joke and I just blushed and made one back, rather than explain.

I do that a lot. If someone misunderstands a minor incident and lets me know with a joke or a comment, then instead of going into a long, boring explanation, I just let them think what they want to and joke about it. 

7.  If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

I'd probably be a teacher. Not around here, though. I'd get fired for refusing to dumb down the curriculum.

I'd probably do both. Most writers do. ;) My sister, a professor of English at Houston University out of Del Mar in Corpus Christie, is also a published author and the horror editor at Ideomancer.com.

She has more energy than I do ... and a lot more patience. I'd never get along with local school systems long enough to get my degree in teaching. I hate rules.

8.   In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

Born in Ohio, Mrs. Hawes lived most of her life in Texas. She had two great kids and a fantastic, fun life. Disabled at thirty-one, Mrs. Hawes ignored her dyslexia to author a series of fantasy novels, "The Dragon Thing To Do. She continued to parent and write, working from home. Editor of the "for the love of e zine", CrossRoads Magic, Mrs. Hawes worked for a short time as an associate editor for Surreal Magazine before her health limited her activity online. She was still active in Whispering Spirits e zine and on message boards, and broke into print publication with the series in 2008.

Her ashes have been scattered by the roadside in Wichita Falls to enable her to haunt her beloved Texas.

Susie Hawes the writer:

9.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

When I was ten, and the teacher hounded me to write a short story then insisted that the rest of the class create their own characters to inhabit the world I'd outlined. She used it as a wall display for our classroom.

I used fiction to get through some of the most boring projects in school. Instead of reports, science projects and the like, I wrote stories based on the subject. Teachers, bored with the same papers, loved it, and I had to include enough research and enough acts to cover the assigned material.

10.  What is going on with your writing these days?

I'm working on book number seven of the Dragon Thing series, researching a comedy/horror series and doing book reviews and articles for Whispering Spirits e zine.

11.  What are your future goals for your writing?

Continue along this course for a decade then try new genres. I'd also like to re-open my CrossRoads Magic e zine.

12.  Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

I work at night, when the kids are down. First I medicate for pain, and take a piping hot shower. Then I do my e mail and any follow up. Then I promote the writing already out there. Then I do a non fiction piece, or promote another writer's work.

Next I write about 1,000 words or edit 1,500.

13.  Why do you write?

I can't not write. If I do the creative juices build up and drown me.

14.  What writer most inspires you? 

I'm inspired by history, myth, daily events, ect. Sensorial or emotional input, rather than fictional example, gets my juices flowing.

15.  How do you define your writing?

It's chaotic, covering several different genres. Basically I think of it as speculative literature; the land of what if.

16.  In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

It was a fun read.

Susie Hawes the details:

17.  Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

http://www.susiehawes.com/; Live Journal http://ghostposts.livejournal.com/

featured author page, http://www.globalgothic.com/pages/features/author.htm

forum at http://forum.sfreader.com/

18.  Is there a place where readers can reach you?

You can e mail me at susie76306@yahoo.com. Be sure to put Contacting Author Susie Hawes as the subject in your e mail. That'll clear the spam filter.

19.  Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

You can find my work in one easy location; at least for now. http://www.fictionwise.com/eBooks/SusieHaweseBooks.htm?cache

in e book format

When I go to print later this year, I'll have a new link at http://www.susiehawes.com/

20.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

I put a lot of comedy in many of my fantasies. My darker work features strong-willed characters in difficult situations. I usually have social commentary and strong character development in my work.

In conclusion:

21. Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

I'm in a transition stage of my writing. Before my fiction was shorter, mostly confined to the electronic media for the longer works. I have always put out short stories in the electronic and print format. I'm going to concentrate more on print versions now, for my novels, producing higher word count and spending a longer time in my worlds, exploring the characters and their impact on the world around them.

The dragon series was designed to do this, but put out in short novels that inter-connected, so that in order to get the whole story arc readers had to get more than one book. The pacing is fast in a Hawes novel, and the story flows so that each book in the serial is a quick read. I'm combining two of each consecutive novel into a longer one so that the reader will have a longer experience in the characters' world.

This may make the read a bit exhausting, as a lot goes on in a Hawes novel, but I feel most readers can chose their own pace rather than have it dictated to them by the author or the format of the novel. A long e book is a difficult read for many people, so by going to a print format I feel it is easier on the reader to be caught up in the experience without the distraction of soreness computer work can cause.

I guess I think of this more than some because of my disability. I am troubled by fibromyalgia and poor eyesight, which limits my time at work.

Many of the readers and authors I know have the same difficulties I experience, and I do keep it in mind when designing a novel or story arc.


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Sunday, 27 January 2008 2:32 AM EST
Post Comment | Permalink
Saturday, 26 January 2008
Getting to Know Denise Patrick
Denise Patrick the person:

1.   What three words do you think describe you as a human being? 

Optimistic, Trusting, Caring

2.    How do you think others would describe you? 

I think they would describe me as a person who is helpful, giving, and always willing to pitch in when there's something to be done.

3.  Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

My faith.  Being a Christian is the center of my life and the thing I'm most likely to talk about when asked.

4.   Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them. 

Nope, no pets - unless you count my kids!

5.   What is your most precious memory? 

The memories I have of my Mom and I when I was young.  Until I was 10, she was essentially a single parent because my Dad was in the military and hardly ever there.  The two of us became very close - she taught me to read and write, and to love books.  She taught me games and was never too busy to sit down on the floor and play with me.

6.   What is your most embarrassing memory? 

I can't remember a single time.  It's likely that I have suppressed all those embarrassing moments because I'm sure I haven't gotten this old without embarrassing myself at least once.

7.   If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life? 

Well, since right now I'm only a part-time writer, I suppose I'd just be doing more of what I do the rest of the time when I'm not working, which is being involved in my church, sewing, and crafting, and playing a lot more tennis.

8.   In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

Daughter, Sister, Wife, Mother - she loved God and projected that love to everyone she met.  She wrote inspirational books about ordinary people who loved God, too, touching hearts as she did.  She also indulged her love of history, the Regency period in particular, by writing wonderful, light-hearted stories of love and faith in times gone by.

She was a very active member of her church, leading the Youth Group for many years, and fondly remembered for being willing to spend overnights almost anywhere the Youth wanted to go.  She will be sorely missed by her sewing and embroidery machines.

Denise Patrick the writer:

9.   Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

OK, that's a tough one.  Was it when I first wrote "The End" on a manuscript?  When I finalled in a contest?  When I signed that first contract?  Or, was it when my first book came out and I was able to hold it in my hot little hands? The second? The third? For me, all of those were new beginnings and the realization all over again that I'm a real writer and people actually are interested in reading what I write.  It's a phenomenal feeling and I re-live it with each book.

10. What is going on with your writing these days? 

I'm working on polishing up the third book in my Gypsy Legacy Series.  There is a fourth book that is not part of the series, but I'm polishing that as well, getting it ready for subbing.  I'm also working on a Regency Inspirational that I want to target to Harlequin's new Love Inspired Historical line.  I'm hoping to finish it before June so I can pitch it at RWA if Harlequin sends someone interested in that line.

11. What are your future goals for your writing? 

I'd like to write and publish at least one or two books a year.  I think, for now, that is a reasonable goal since I don't plan to quit my day job. (I'm too close to retirement.)  Once I retire, I would like to concentrate on writing more and getting more books out, but that all depends on my health and my family.

12. Can you describe a typical writing day for you? 

I work full-time and don't have the willpower to get up early, so I usually don't get a chance to write until the evenings.  If I don't have a chat (I meet with my CP's through IM), I eat dinner, then get right on the computer.  If it's a good night, I usually have a good three hours in which to write.  Some nights are better than others, but if I'm on a roll, I'll write until I run out of steam.  I do carry my current WIP on a USB key with me at all times, so if I decide to stay in my office to eat lunch, I might plug it into my computer at work and write a little on it.  That's rare, though.

13.  Why do you write?

I write because I love to create stories.  I have always had an active imagination and sometimes I write just to get the voices out of my head and onto paper.  That was the case with my first published book, Adopting Alyssa.  I was actually working on another book, but this story kept cropping up and wouldn't let me be.  So, I wrote it to get it out of my head.

14.   What writer most inspires you? 

That's a loaded question.  There are so many authors that I love to read and am inspired by.  Julia Quinn, Amanda Quick, Eloisa James, Mary Balogh, Celeste Bradley, Nicole Jordan, and the list goes on.  Why?  Because they can take a historical period and bring it to life in a way that no history book can.  They can breathe life into characters and places, and drop you right into the middle of history - and make you care about the characters they've created.  Sometimes when writing my own books, I might remember one of theirs and think, "Character so-and-so would be around during my book, too."  It's too bad I can't refer to theirs as well.  Of course, that would probably confuse readers, so it's probably a good thing we don't populate our historicals with other authors' characters.

15. How do you define your writing? 

I consider them sweet fairy tales for adults. All of my stories MUST have a happy ending.  And, since I write inspirationals as well as historicals, I created my slogan to reflect that:  "Heaven begins with an HEA. . ." Heaven represents the happy ending and my inspirationals, and HEA is a play on the phrase "Happily Ever After".

16. In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years? 

She wrote inspirational stories in which love ALWAYS won the day.

Denise Patrick the details:

17. Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog? 

I don't have a website - that's this year's project.  Right now, my blog (http://denisesden.blogspot.com) has everything on it you might want to know about me, or a link to find it.

18. Is there a place where readers can reach you?

My email is: denisepatrick@gmail.com (without the spaces, of course) I also have a forum on Coffee Time Romance (http://www.coffeetimeromance.com/board/forumdisplay.php?f=296 )  where you can chat with me, ask questions, read excerpts and learn about contests.

19. Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

Adopting Alyssa from By Grace Publishing (Nov 2006) (Inspirational)

The Importance of Almack's from Samhain Publishing (July 2007) (Regency)

Gypsy Legacy: The Marquis from Samhain Publishing (November 2007) (Victorian)

Strikes Don't Matter from By Grace Publishing (January 2008) (Inspirational)

20. For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

I hope they expect - and get - a well-written story that stays with them long after they finish the last page.  A story that tugs at the emotions as well as provokes occasional laughter.

In conclusion:

21. Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

I'm a history-a-holic.  I love Central European as well as English history.  I also love fairy-tales and tend to weave fairy-tale-esque themes into my plots.  Think Cinderella, Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, etc.  Even my contemporaries are likely have a reference to some historical fact buried in them.

I also love a good mystery and many of my books have a mystery element to them.  Sometimes it's as simple as the identity of a character.  Other times, it's something that could hurt the hero or heroine somehow.  Because, as a reader, I love it when I figure something out, I ennoy it when a reader writes me and tells me they figured it out before the end of the book - that tells me that I did my job and left appropriate clues.   Although I also don't mind the occasional surprise ending.


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Saturday, 26 January 2008 12:55 AM EST
Post Comment | Permalink
Friday, 25 January 2008
Getting to Know Bess McBride
Topic: Author Interview
Bess McBride the person:

1.  What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Fair, funny, foolish

2.  How do you think others would describe you?

Funny, nice, temperamental if they know me well. 

 

3.  Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

Animal rights, women's equality, the environment, child welfare, global peace.

4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.

I have two cats:  Deuteronomy is a humongous Idaho cat from the Humane Society whom we call Dooty.  He likes to pick on the older, smaller, female.  He talks a lot and loves to be pet.  Xena is my small petite warrior princess from a box in front of a grocery store in Washington State who doesn't like to be held, but will allow people to pet her on occasion.  She's half feral, her daddy having been a feral cat, and it shows.

5.  What is your most precious memory?

So many... The birth of my one and only daughter.  The second is the birth of her daughter.

6.  What is your most embarrassing memory?

I'd be too embarrassed to say... and there have been so many.  Okay, laughing so hard in front of a group of people that I wet my pants, and having to run all the way back to my room to change.  That stands out for me.

7.  If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

I should be working as a mental health counselor for which I'm trained, licensed and paying student loans.  
 

8.   In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

Here lies Bess McBride, a silly woman who tried as hard as she could to realize as many dreams as she could in her short amount of time on this planet. 

Oh, yeah, and loving mother of Cinnamon, grandmother of Lily.

Bess McBride the writer:

9.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

When I got my first acceptance of a humor submission for a magazine two years ago.

10.  What is going on with your writing these days?

I'm busy, busy, busy.  I have one book out in digital and print, one book coming out in February 08 and three more under contract.  Right now, I'm writing my first romantic suspense.  I've written five books in the last year...like a woman possessed.

11.  What are your future goals for your writing?

To be multi-published.  I'd like to publish four books a year.  At this time, I'm happy to stay with small presses.  Of course, I'd like to hit the big New York houses, but I'm not in any rush to put myself through the world of rejections.

12.  Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

While I'm not working full time during the winter, I get up in the morning, go through e-mails, promotions, etc., and write from about 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. when I quit to go for a walk on the beach.  When I work in the summer, I'll ask for a late shift, work a few hours in the morning and a few at night after everyone is in bed.

13.  Why do you write?

Because it's great fun.  I get such an adrenaline rush when the story begins to take off, and I can barely type fast enough to keep up with it.  Now, edits are another story.  I already know the end of the story!

14.  What writer most inspires you?  Why?

Well, Georgette Heyer inspired me because I loved her writing.  She was humorous and gracious and wrote wonderful romances.

15.  How do you define your writing?

Prolific, hardly sweet but fades to black, humorous at times, always romantic.  Scenery is key.  Most of my books will be set in beautiful locations.  I love to travel and set my books in the wonderful places I've been.

16.  In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

"Bess McBride!  Oh, I loved her books."

Bess McBride the details:

17.  Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

My website is www.bessmcbride.com.  Right now I only blog on myspace at www.myspace.com/bessmcbride

18.  Is there a place where readers can reach you?

Certainly!  I'm at bessmcbride@gmail.com  I'd love to hear from anyone.

19.  Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

"Love of My Heart," available from The Wild Rose Press at www.thewildrosepress.com and Amazon at www.amazon.com as well as all online bookstores.

"A Sigh of Love" comes out February 2008 at The Wild Rose Press and Fictionwise at www.fictionwise.com

"Caribbean Dreams of Love" will be out in 2008 at The Wild Rose Press

"Across the Room" will be out in 2008 at The Wild Rose Press

"A Train through Time" will be out in 2008 at The Wild Rose Press

20.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

Expect no explicit or graphic sexual details.  I fade to black.  That's what I like to read and so that's what I write.  Expect exotic and beautiful locations.  I choose my setting first and set my characters and plot in that location.  I love time travels and hope to do more of those.  My paranormals are very gentle...mostly contemporary with a suggestion of time travel or a humorous romantic ghost.

In conclusion:

21.  Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

Oh gosh!  I hope that readers find my books a pleasant, fulfilling read.  My goal is to give them a few hours of enjoyment...not to keep them up at night worrying about having their toes hanging over the edge of the bed.  I write some paranormals, but they are always gentle, much like "Ghost" or "Somewhere in Time."  My contemporaries are romantic, sometimes sensual, but not sexually explicit.  Again, I fade to black.  I hope my time travels are fun.  I love the juxtaposition of modern and old. 

I want readers to enjoy my romances, to feel as if they were the heroine of the story.  I'd like to think that my stories are written for real women who just want a little bit of romance in their lives.  My heroines are not the traditional "spunky," confident gals because those sorts of heroines don't hold my interest.  I like my heroines and heroes to be slightly flawed...just like all of us...and capable of forming lifelong attachments...sometimes at first sight.  That's the romance of it.


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Friday, 25 January 2008 12:11 AM EST
Post Comment | View Comments (1) | Permalink
Thursday, 24 January 2008
Getting to Know J. D. Webb
J. D. Webb  the person:

1. What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Christian, mischievous, adorable

2.      How do you think others would describe you?

Christian, mischievous, talented

3.  Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

Reading and stealing from other authors to better learn my craft. Not stealing their words but their approach. The way they describe a scene/character or provide clues to the reader.

4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.

A 5-year-old toy poodle, Ginger, rules our household and allows me to live with her.

5.  What is your most precious memory?

After my wedding day, the day my publisher sent me an email saying attached is your contract.

6.  What is your most embarrassing memory?

At my high school prom I was up on a dais with my date after she had been crowned prom queen and in my haste to escape to the back of the stage, I knocked over a huge spotlight. Never had another date with that girl for some reason.

7.  If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

Probably working as a starving cartoonist.

8.  In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

Here lies Dave Webb, he loved his Lord, his wife, his life. The Nobel Prize for literature just happened along the way.

J. D. Webb the writer:

9.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

About 25 years ago when I received a check for $30 for a short story I submitted to a writing magazine.

10.  What is going on with your writing these days?

My third book Her Name Is Mommy came out in December and I'm about 90% through my next, a stand-alone called The Smudge. Here's the tag line: A small-town paralegal goes to her ATM machine one nasty night and wipes a smudge off the screen. It's blood.

I have two others started, one a western titled Rattler and the other is the third in my Mike Shepherd PI series called Aftermath.

11.  What are your future goals for your writing?

Just to keep at it, to keep improving and to keep getting feedback from readers saying they can't put it down.

12.  Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

Nope. I write when I can with no set routine except I try to get in 3 - 4 hours a day. That is except for Friday which is our date day, and Sunday which is my Sabbath.

13.  Why do you write?

I have no choice. I must write because these characters keep swirling around in my head yelling at me they want out. Please don't call my shrink.

14.  What writer most inspires you?  Why?

I can't pick out just one. I admire the masters who grab me and thrust me into their world. I want to kick the snot out of their bad guys and shake the hands of the protagonists and if my wife isn't looking, hug all the beautiful damsels.

15.  How do you define your writing?

I write cozy mysteries. I believe I can weave a suspenseful tale without all the vulgarity and excessive violence so prevalent today. There are murders and mayhem in my stories, I'm just not beating you over the head with them. And when sex happens it is inferred not explained.

16.  In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

He entertained and intrigued with a laugh or two along the way.

J. D.  Webb the details:

17.  Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

I'm not a blogger. I want to spend my time writing a story. My website is http://www.jdwebb.com/ where you can read the first chapters of all my books and even a short story when you visit.

18.  Is there a place where readers can reach you?

I love to hear from my readers. I treasure hearing from readers both what they liked and what they didn't like. Makes me a better writer. My email addy is: jdwebb99@yahoo.com

19.  Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

I'd better be able to do that.

Shepherd's Pie (Golden Wings Award winner)

Moon Over Chicago (2008 Eppie Finalist)

Her Name Is Mommy (Now available)

The Smudge (coming soon)

20.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

Always I try to make you laugh, cringe at my antagonists, pull for my protagonists, can't help but turn the page, and say at the end I didn't see that coming. My pledge is to improve my writing with each book.

In conclusion:

21.  Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

About me? I hope you've learned a little about me from this interview and my website. I love to have fun and tell stories.

About my writing? I hope you'll find everything in answer #20. My books are not lengthy and I don't dwell on description. A weapon may be identified but you won't get the entire history of that piece. I allow readers to use their imagination while reading my stories. You don't know much about my main character's looks because the story is coming from his or her point of view. You imagine who that person looks like. I've had people tell me that so-and-so should play Mike Shepherd in the movie (I should be so lucky). When that happens I seldom have that person in mind.

I pride myself in the fact that there is a twist at the end that you don't see coming. That's because until the end I have no idea how the book will turn out. All I ask is to give me a try. You just might like my stories.

Joyce it has been a pleasure to be interviewed by you. I love your different questions. I wish all happy reading.


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Thursday, 24 January 2008 4:47 PM EST
Post Comment | Permalink
Wednesday, 23 January 2008
Taking a Fun Meme Break
Topic: Miscellaneous

I've been meme'd by by Billie A. Williams of http://printedwords.blogspot.com

Here are the rules:

The Rules: Link to the person who tagged you. Post the rules on your blog. Share six non-important things/habits/quirks about yourself. Tag six random people at the end of your post by linking to their blogs. Let each random person know they have been tagged by leaving a comment on their website.

My problem is narrowing my quirks to six :-)

1.  When I was in kindergarten, I drove my teacher crazy and was told I was no longer allowed to "play house" because I insisted I had "five kids and no husband".

2.  I have times of "disassociation" when I'm stressed and "watch" myself going through the day.

3.  I have a genuine railroad crossing sign hanging on my living room wall.

4.  The favorite gift I ever received was a replica of the Groundhog Day groundhog that wiggles its butt as it sings "I'm All Right".  My son picked it out for one birthday because "Mama needs to laugh more".

5.  I surprise my son's friends because I not only know a lot about Pokemon--but also have my own Pokemon deck and can actually win games.

6.  My startle reflex is so sensitive I once counted and found I'd "jumped" for one reason or another 19 times in one day.  The ringing of a telephone or alarm clock has me shaking inside for nearly ten minutes.

 

Okay, that's done--I'm tagging:

Joyce Scarborough http://joycescarbrough.blogspot.com/

Phil Harris  http://philipharris.blog.com/

Dorien Grey  http://www.doriengrey.blogspot.com/

Jamieson Wolf http://www.jamiesonwolf.blogspot.com/

Tiffany Fitch http://www.xanga.com/neuroticfitchmom

Teri Brown http://tjbrown.blogspot.com/


Posted by joyceanthony at 1:39 AM EST
Post Comment | View Comments (3) | Permalink
Tuesday, 22 January 2008
Getting to Know Amber T. Kingston
Topic: Author Interview
Amber T. Kingston the person:

1. What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Quirky, Compassionate, and Generous

2.  How do you think others would describe you?

Loyal, Caring, and Giving.

3.   Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

Art. Drawing is the first thing I remember really falling in love with. My mother enrolled me in art classes when I was five and I've loved it ever since! Although I never went on to complete any other formal art education when I was older, it was something I continued to do in my free time at home.

4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.
 

I have two cats: Mouse and Geneva. Mouse is all-white with green eyes and is fairly quiet and reserved. Geneva is all-black with gold eyes and is talkative and rambunctious. Unfortunately, neither girl gets along with the other so we have to keep our home divided into two sections with a tall iron gate, giving each cat her run of part of the house.

5.  What is your most precious memory?

Building a "Square-foot Garden" with my grandfather in our back yard. It was very special and meant a lot to me to spend time alone with my grandfather. He acted as a father to me because I didn't have one. Our garden project was so important and fun for me. We grew radishes, carrots, tomatoes, corn, onions, and my favorite . . . sunflowers.

6.  What is your most embarrassing memory?

Forgetting to change my tights during the second act of a dance recital. I was the only girl on stage wearing white tights compared to the other girl's nude-colored legs. I was so panicked once I realized my mistake, that I also forgot the steps to the dance routine!

7.  If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

I would probably still be training to become an embalmer. I think the end of someone's life deserves as much care, dignity and respect as living part of it. Unfortunately, not many people want to be involved in the aspect of caring for the deceased. I imagine that soon I will find a balance between writing and becoming re-involved in the world of funeral care.

Amber T. Kingston the writer:

8.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

It was in my late twenties. I had been working on a young adult novel for 5 years, and had completed it at whopping 1100 pages. During that period I couldn't go anywhere without a pencil and my notebook-not even the movie theater!

9.   What is going on with your writing these days?

I'm currently working on my next book in the Laura series. After that, I have one more in mind. I'll be traveling to Germany to visit Laura this spring and I plan to take plenty of pictures of her to use as reference material this time! So right now it's all about writing the story, and then come springtime, I'll begin illustrating again.

10.  What are your future goals for your writing?

I'd like to revise and publish the young adult novel I began so long ago. Then I'd like to try writing in different genres to keep writing fresh and challenging for me. Fantasy for young adults comes to mind first, then perhaps a memoir.

11.   Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

I really don't have a typical writing day, but I probably should. Sometimes a write non-stop, sometimes I'll skip a day, some days are a combination of writing and drawing. It really varies and depends on my mood.

12.  Why do you write?

Writing makes me happy and I find a certain peace within it. It also allows me to connect to others in a way I'm comfortable with.

13.  What writer most inspires you?  Why?

When I was young, my favorite stories were by an author named Stephen Cosgrove. He had a series called the Serendipity books, which I still own today. I loved these stories and their colorful illustrations. Each book had a moral clearly stated at the end of it and I really liked that aspect as well.

14.  How do you define your writing?

I've never tried to define my writing before because I don't really think it can be done. I write about many different subjects in various forms. My first published book just happens to be a children's story. So right now, I'd say my writing is for families, the young, and young-at-heart. But overall, writing is simply an enjoyable craft that I can create for myself and others.

15.  In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

That they still have one dog-eared copy of one of my books in their house.

Amber T. Kingston the details:

16.  Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

You can visit my website at http://www.chrysalispress.com/. You can also read my blog on Amazon.com or myspace.com/ambertkingston.

17.  Is there a place where readers can reach you?

I always love to hear from my readers or anyone who simply has a question for me. I can be reached at amber@chrysalispress.com.

18.  Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

Laura and the Leprechauns by Amber T. Kingston

19.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

A fairytale adventure full of surprises and mischievous fun.

In conclusion:

20.  Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

Writing and drawing have been two of my greatest passions since early childhood. I hope that my stories and artwork bring enjoyment to those who embrace them, and I hope to encourage others who share my desire for creating, to pursue their dreams.


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Tuesday, 22 January 2008 12:05 AM EST
Post Comment | Permalink
Monday, 21 January 2008
Getting to Know Annette Snyder
Topic: Author Interview
Annette Snyder the person

1.  What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Loyal, Supportive, Colorful

2.  How do you think others would describe you?

Loyal, Supportive, Extremely Colorful

3.      Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

I find being a good person in a world that sometimes seems a little off edge is the best thing any person can accomplish.

4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.

I have a thirteen-year-old Weimaraner named Ginger.  She's got a beautiful brown coat (because she's mixed with a Chesapeake) and dark eyes.  She smiles when she sees me.  I also have a five-year-old mix between a Chihuahua and a Pomeranian named Snack, who, incidentally, also smiles when she sees me even though I find her personality a little harsh. And the neighbors Chihuahua, Teddy, squeezed through the gate last week and knocked her up. Anyone want a free puppy?

5.  What is your most precious memory?

There's so many, to pick one is impossible but, when I was very small, my grandfather would hoist me up in the air and tell me to hold out my arms.  He'd announce that I was his angel.  I was lucky enough to have him around until I was twelve.

6.  What is your most embarrassing memory?

There's so many, to pick just one is impossible!  I got a speeding ticket the other day on my way to take someone to the airport.  I had the day off from work and, while the cop had me stopped on the side of the road, my boss drove by.  The next day at work there were signs posted everywhere about me being a jailbird and where they were collecting bail money.

7.   If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

Laundry and dishes-maybe dusting.
 

8.      In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

I'm going to skip this question for personal reasons.  I will say that I want a giant beer party.  I want people to join together and remember the good things I did and the people I helped and loved.  Cry if you want, but don't cry forever.  It wastes precious laughing time.

Annette Snyder the writer:

9.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

When I woke up with an idea in my head about a story, wrote it down and it worked.  It surprised me that I could actually write an entire book. Then I wrote fifteen more and I knew.

10.  What is going on with your writing these days?

I've got publishers looking at two manuscripts, one book coming out in May, one just released last December and I'm writing an interesting novel where a woman's married lover is killed in a car accident and later she falls in love with a man whose wife was having an affair and was killed in a car accident.

11.  What are your future goals for your writing?

I'd like to be able to devote more attention to writing than I do.  My goal, and I rarely make goals, is to have more name recognition for my writing self by 2015.  That's ten years after the release of my first novel.

12.  Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

I get up at five in the morning and write for three hours before I go to work.  After work, I answer email and do my writing business.  On weekends, when I'm home cleaning and such, I try and write at least four hours a day.

13.  Why do you write?

I write to keep the bizarre dreams I usually have down to a minimum.  I mean, I dream of weird aliens that resemble Donald Duck and giant lizards terrorizing French restaurants-that sort of bizarre.  When I write, I sleep better.

14.  What writer most inspires you?  Why?

I love the way some authors write with the unexpected twists fit into the story but at the end of the novel, the whole premise of the plot changes.  Margaret Mitchell is my favorite author but I don't so much like the sequels to Gone with the Wind.  They just aren't the same.

15.  How do you define your writing?

Romantically comedic and adventurously real

16.  In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

Annette Snyder's timeless writing captures the heart of the nation with its realistic portrayal of midwestern life in small towns.

Annette Snyder the details:

17.  Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

http://annettesnyder.atspace.com/   http://www.growne.com/  http://www.whiskeycreekpress.com/  http://www.westernauthors.com/  http://mockingbird.creighton.edu/NCW/writers.htm

http://www.sewardchapters.com/

Plus google, mobi, fictionwise and affiliates, amazon and a lot more.

18.  Is there a place where readers can reach you?

I have a contact link at my website http://annettesndyer.atspace.com/ I also share a myspace with my firefighter hubby.  Just search the myspace accounts for ‘firefighter al' and I'll pop up.  My publisher Whiskey Creek Press also maintains a myspace page.

19.  Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

Sally Murphy, Liberty Road, Travis Pass, Rock Creek, Whiskey Shots Volume 1, Albert's Rain, Arpetta Honor-releasing May 2008

20.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

These published novels are historical/adventure/romance based at the turn of the century and during the Civil War periods. 

In conclusion:

21.  Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

I was fortunate to be born third generation American to immigrants who migrated to America from Czechoslovakia, Germany and France while they were very young. They started their families when they were fifteen and sixteen and, when I was young, my great grandparents were really old, but still of sound mind.  I sat for hours and listened to their stories of migration and growing up.  Visions of harsh blizzards and damaging locust swarms were probably terrible while they occurred, but I found the accounts to be fascinating.  I pictured my relatives conquering vast open plains on wagons towed by mismatched horses.  I sat enthralled when they told me stories of meeting Indians and how they traded for necessities. 

I paid attention to descriptions of staking shelter inside dark caves and caring for sick children--stories of survival in times when medicines, doctors and neighbors were miles away. 

While I listened to these ancient people recount their lives, I wondered how on earth anyone could survive during times when grocery stores were non-existent and maps only transpired between passersby and involved landmarks like rocks, trees and creek beds.  I wasn't sure why but I had a feeling, someday, all the information I learned would be useful and I needed to pay attention. 

Years later, my dearest friend told me the story of how her ancestors migrated to the Dakota's and I got the idea for Travis Pass, the first in my historical series.  Not true stories, by any means, but they contain elements of truth from rich history reports I listened to as a child. 

Readers tell me my characters are so well developed that they can't help but be caught up in my stories and they envision the struggles faced and the accomplishments gained. 


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Monday, 21 January 2008 4:14 AM EST
Post Comment | View Comments (1) | Permalink
Sunday, 20 January 2008
Getting to Know Greg Babic
Topic: Author Interview

Don't forget to check out Greg's very special gift at the end of his interview!!

Greg Babic (Gregory Victor Babic), the person:

1.  What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Caring, thoughtful, and honest.

2.  How do you think others would describe you?

Loving, intelligent, and loyal.

3.  Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

Family, lifelong learning, teaching, mentoring, reading, going to the movies, studying the geodesic dome form, creating hand-made games and puzzles, and being a good friend.

4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.

"Princess Mischka B. Babic" is our beautiful, yellow, pure-bred Labrador puppy, who only came into our lives just over a year ago and who has already become an irreplacable member of the family. Mischka demands nothing but love and affection, and gives it back one-hundred-fold (no lie). I can honestly say that she has totally changed my life in the last twelve months!

5.  What is your most precious memory?

Christmas 1975: when I was 12 years old and got a Remington portable manual typewriter (a keyboard that prints, for those of you too young to remember "typewriters"), including a snazzy little leather zip-up cover. I thought it was the best present I ever received (and still do). Mind you, Joyce, Mum and Dad did not make it easy for me to guess what I was getting that day, believe me - because they put it at the bottom of an empty refrigerator box, which they then filled with crumpled up newspapers, so that, as I desperately pulled out balled-up-paper after balled-up-paper, I had no idea at all what I was going to find at the bottom of the box. All I remember is that, when I finally pulled out the zippered object and opened it, I cried with all my heart - because it was exactly what I had wanted. Sadly, though, I no longer have that (or any) typewriter; but it doesn't matter, because I will never, ever forget the day I got it - and how much it meant to me!

6.  What is your most embarrassing memory?

Telling my future sister-in-law, on her Wedding Day (when she was going to marry my oldest brother), that she "scrubbed up all right" (an endearing Australian expression, isn't it?). Sadly, she later divorced my brother - although I have been assured that my tactlessness played no part!

7.  If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

Teaching and Learning - Always.

8.   In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

Loving husband (hopefully one day), father (hopefully one day), son, brother, uncle, and, most of all, friend (to many); Greg will be remembered always for his compassion, helpfulness, and thoughtfulness. Although sadly missed, his books will always remind us of him.

Greg Babic (Gregory Victor Babic), the writer:

9.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

This would have been when I won the "University of Sydney Union Literary Competition - Prose Section" in my first year at university (1982). Although I had been writing by that time for nearly a decade, it was the first time that I had received external validation. I did not complete my second year of university until much later (1988), however - but I felt validated again when I won the "Henry Lawson Prize for Prose" (administered by the University of Sydney) that time around.

10.  What is going on with your writing these days?

I'm not sure where to start Joyce... I have only just received an email (January 15, 2008) from Amazon.com advising me that my young adult novel, "The Profile", has been selected as a Semi-Finalist in the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award Contest (I would be delighted if readers would download, read, and then review the excerpt here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0011G9XZ0) - and I am definitely extremely excited about that (especially as this will be my first published work of fiction, after three non-fiction books). Also, my third book, "Words to Inspire Writers" (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0980372208), has just been published (January 1, 2008) by F. C. Sach & Sons, Publishers (an extensive sampler can be downloaded from here: http://fcsachandsonspublishers.com/sampler/), so that is something else to be thankful for. Finally, I am compiling my short stories into a collection that will hopefully be published later in the year. All in all, I would say that 2008 is turning into the best year ever for my writing!

11.  What are your future goals for your writing?

Specific goals would obviously include seeing my young adult novel, "The Profile", published soon, as well as my first Short Story collection - and then working on increasing my online presence as a Writer. Whatever direction I take, however, I just know that Writing is always going to be a part of my life.

12.  Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

I do not have typical writing days, per se: I tend to write when the spirit moves me (so to speak). I might find myself chained to the keyboard for hours (and sometimes days) when I am consumed by a story, or an article, or a chapter, or whatever; but then I experience days, even weeks, when I cannot write at all. "Words to Inspire Writers" (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0980372208) grew out of an attempt to beat my own Writer's Block and I hope it will be just as helpful (and motivating) for other writers caught in a black hole.

13.  Why do you write?

I write because my imagination forces me to: it seeks an outlet. Words, therefore, become an expression of my wide-ranging thoughts and often intense feelings.

14.  What writer most inspires you?  Why?

You know, Joyce, this is a really hard question to answer. I love to read. I read voraciously and across all genres (in both fiction and non-fiction). And my tastes definitely change over time and depending upon my circumstances. I grew up devouring science fiction (the old masters, like Heinlein, Asimov, Clarke, Simak, etc.), moved to fantasy (Tolkien, Lewis, Norton, and others), but then switched to horror (King, Koontz, Rice, Barker, Straub, to start with), where I dwelled for many years. I discovered non-fiction when completing my Bachelor of Arts degree, and later my Postgraduate Diploma in Secondary Education, and will today try basically anything non-fiction that catches my eye (lately this has included Carl Sagan, Richard Dawkins, Christopher Hitchens, and John Grogan, as a sampling from my shelves show). Today I have so many contemporary (fiction) writers that I admire (like Gene Brewer, Jeremy Robinson, Tess Gerritsen, Jonathan Kellerman, James Patterson, Stephen Hunter, Robert B Parker, Michael Crichton, Elmore Leonard, David Morrell, Douglas Preston, Dean R Koontz, Donald E Westlake, Lincoln Child, Tom Clancy, Dan Brown, Thomas Harris, Steve Alten, and John Sandford - to name only some of them[?]), and, in a totally different vein, classic authors too (like James A Michener, Louis L'Amour, and Ayn Rand, to name just an eclectic few), but the one person writing today I probably most admire, and relate to, is the young Australian thriller writer, Matthew Reilly (and, especially, his Shane Schofield character, the "Scarecrow"). Matthew writes like no one I have ever read before; his prose positively sparkling with energy and pace. I have never devoured pages as quickly as I have when reading his books (and I read them many, many times too!). Each story is so cinematic, it awaits only the transfer to film (that I feel certain will come one day). I also admire the chutzpah Matthew showed in self-publishing his first novel, and then hawking it through Sydney booksellers - where it was noticed and picked up for republishing by a traditional publisher. Well done, Matthew. And, believe it or not, he seems to really know the universal struggle writers face better than many other writers I have read, as he exhorts, in each of his books, "To anyone who knows a writer, never underestimate the power of your encouragement..." I will automatically buy any one of his novels as they come out, because I think he is such an enjoyable read! But again, Joyce, please remember what I said: I just love to read, and will generally give any writer recommended to me a chance (regardless of genre).

15.  How do you define your writing?

Eclectic, in a word. My first three books have all been non-fiction, but my lifelong passion has been to create narratives (whether in novel, screenplay, or short story form), and I still hope to bring many of these unpublished works to market one day.

16.  In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

Greg Babic was someone who tried to make a difference through his writing - teaching and entertaining always.

Greg Babic (Gregory Victor Babic), the details:

17.  Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

My website can be found at http://gregbabic.com/ and it does include an occasional blog post, but blogging is totally new to me and the posts to date are few and far between (something I do hope to work on in the future).

18.  Is there a place where readers can reach you?

The best way to contact me directly is via http://gregbabic.com/contact/ (where you will find my email address in graphic form - to foil the spam spiders crawling the Net!).

19.  Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

My first book came about when I was teaching in greater metropolitan Sydney high schools. Convinced that students of all ages could achieve whatever they set their minds to, with the right guidance and encouragement, I wrote Study Success Know-How: A 1,001-Point Action Checklist Designed To Help You Take Control Of Your Learning And Maximise Your Achievement Potential - Immediately! (2nd Edition currently available from Five Senses Education, ISBN 1-876932-19-8). My second book, Film Study Terms: A glossary of key concepts related to the study of Film, followed (also from Five Senses Education, ISBN 1-876932-97-X), allowing any student of Film to better understand the language of Film Study. My third book, a brand new motivational compilation for Writers (1,100 Quotations from over 300 Authors!), titled Words to Inspire Writers: A perpetual Calendar of classic Writing-related Quotations - on Writers, Writing, Words, Books, Literature, and Publishing - specifically selected to illustrate the Writing Process and to motivate Authors every day (ISBN 978-0-980372-20-5), has just been published by F. C. Sach & Sons, Publishers (http://fcsachandsonspublishers.com/) and is now available for purchase from Amazon.com(http://www.amazon.com/dp/0980372208), other online booksellers, or through bookstores everywhere (via Ingram Book Group).

20.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

My three published works - all non-fiction - provide readers with answers to specific problems (as in, for instance, how to study successfully, how to understand the language of Film Study, and how writers can motivate themselves every day and, hopefully, overcome Writer's Block as a result). My fiction - as it comes to market in the future - will showcase my diverse interests, my caring nature, and my passionate devotion to telling a good story (whatever the genre).

In conclusion:

21.  Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

Now you've truly stumped me, Joyce. What do I want people to know about me and my writing? How about, "That my writing is genuine - it comes from my heart and soul - and it generally has something special and unique to say." The most important message I would like to share with any other writer in the world (of any age, in any culture, writing in any language), by way of encouragement and support, is that "Your Message Matters (whatever it might be) - to Someone, Somewhere." Everything you write has value (in one form or another)! To help spread that message, Joyce, I would be absolutely delighted to send a pdf copy of a wonderfully whimsical fable I wrote, called "The Novelist and the Nightingale", to any of your readers who emails me with "Joyce Anthony Special Offer" in the Subject line. It's a little tale I am quite proud of (which will be included in my upcoming short story collection) and your readers will be the first to read it anywhere in the World (I promise that it will not appear anywhere else before it ends up in the printed compilation)!

Just before I finish up Joyce, may I please take this opportunity to say how much I have truly enjoyed being interviewed for your website. The experience has been enlightening and helpful. It has allowed me to think carefully about myself - as a writer - and also about my readers (where-ever they might be). Thank you also for letting me spread the news about my books with your loyal readers. To me, there is nothing more generous that a writer can do to help another writer! Again, thank you.


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Sunday, 20 January 2008 12:27 AM EST
Post Comment | View Comments (1) | Permalink

Newer | Latest | Older