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Friday, 25 January 2008
Getting to Know Bess McBride
Topic: Author Interview
Bess McBride the person:

1.  What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Fair, funny, foolish

2.  How do you think others would describe you?

Funny, nice, temperamental if they know me well. 

 

3.  Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

Animal rights, women's equality, the environment, child welfare, global peace.

4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.

I have two cats:  Deuteronomy is a humongous Idaho cat from the Humane Society whom we call Dooty.  He likes to pick on the older, smaller, female.  He talks a lot and loves to be pet.  Xena is my small petite warrior princess from a box in front of a grocery store in Washington State who doesn't like to be held, but will allow people to pet her on occasion.  She's half feral, her daddy having been a feral cat, and it shows.

5.  What is your most precious memory?

So many... The birth of my one and only daughter.  The second is the birth of her daughter.

6.  What is your most embarrassing memory?

I'd be too embarrassed to say... and there have been so many.  Okay, laughing so hard in front of a group of people that I wet my pants, and having to run all the way back to my room to change.  That stands out for me.

7.  If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

I should be working as a mental health counselor for which I'm trained, licensed and paying student loans.  
 

8.   In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

Here lies Bess McBride, a silly woman who tried as hard as she could to realize as many dreams as she could in her short amount of time on this planet. 

Oh, yeah, and loving mother of Cinnamon, grandmother of Lily.

Bess McBride the writer:

9.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

When I got my first acceptance of a humor submission for a magazine two years ago.

10.  What is going on with your writing these days?

I'm busy, busy, busy.  I have one book out in digital and print, one book coming out in February 08 and three more under contract.  Right now, I'm writing my first romantic suspense.  I've written five books in the last year...like a woman possessed.

11.  What are your future goals for your writing?

To be multi-published.  I'd like to publish four books a year.  At this time, I'm happy to stay with small presses.  Of course, I'd like to hit the big New York houses, but I'm not in any rush to put myself through the world of rejections.

12.  Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

While I'm not working full time during the winter, I get up in the morning, go through e-mails, promotions, etc., and write from about 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. when I quit to go for a walk on the beach.  When I work in the summer, I'll ask for a late shift, work a few hours in the morning and a few at night after everyone is in bed.

13.  Why do you write?

Because it's great fun.  I get such an adrenaline rush when the story begins to take off, and I can barely type fast enough to keep up with it.  Now, edits are another story.  I already know the end of the story!

14.  What writer most inspires you?  Why?

Well, Georgette Heyer inspired me because I loved her writing.  She was humorous and gracious and wrote wonderful romances.

15.  How do you define your writing?

Prolific, hardly sweet but fades to black, humorous at times, always romantic.  Scenery is key.  Most of my books will be set in beautiful locations.  I love to travel and set my books in the wonderful places I've been.

16.  In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

"Bess McBride!  Oh, I loved her books."

Bess McBride the details:

17.  Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

My website is www.bessmcbride.com.  Right now I only blog on myspace at www.myspace.com/bessmcbride

18.  Is there a place where readers can reach you?

Certainly!  I'm at bessmcbride@gmail.com  I'd love to hear from anyone.

19.  Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

"Love of My Heart," available from The Wild Rose Press at www.thewildrosepress.com and Amazon at www.amazon.com as well as all online bookstores.

"A Sigh of Love" comes out February 2008 at The Wild Rose Press and Fictionwise at www.fictionwise.com

"Caribbean Dreams of Love" will be out in 2008 at The Wild Rose Press

"Across the Room" will be out in 2008 at The Wild Rose Press

"A Train through Time" will be out in 2008 at The Wild Rose Press

20.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

Expect no explicit or graphic sexual details.  I fade to black.  That's what I like to read and so that's what I write.  Expect exotic and beautiful locations.  I choose my setting first and set my characters and plot in that location.  I love time travels and hope to do more of those.  My paranormals are very gentle...mostly contemporary with a suggestion of time travel or a humorous romantic ghost.

In conclusion:

21.  Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

Oh gosh!  I hope that readers find my books a pleasant, fulfilling read.  My goal is to give them a few hours of enjoyment...not to keep them up at night worrying about having their toes hanging over the edge of the bed.  I write some paranormals, but they are always gentle, much like "Ghost" or "Somewhere in Time."  My contemporaries are romantic, sometimes sensual, but not sexually explicit.  Again, I fade to black.  I hope my time travels are fun.  I love the juxtaposition of modern and old. 

I want readers to enjoy my romances, to feel as if they were the heroine of the story.  I'd like to think that my stories are written for real women who just want a little bit of romance in their lives.  My heroines are not the traditional "spunky," confident gals because those sorts of heroines don't hold my interest.  I like my heroines and heroes to be slightly flawed...just like all of us...and capable of forming lifelong attachments...sometimes at first sight.  That's the romance of it.


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Friday, 25 January 2008 12:11 AM EST
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Thursday, 24 January 2008
Getting to Know J. D. Webb
J. D. Webb  the person:

1. What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Christian, mischievous, adorable

2.      How do you think others would describe you?

Christian, mischievous, talented

3.  Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

Reading and stealing from other authors to better learn my craft. Not stealing their words but their approach. The way they describe a scene/character or provide clues to the reader.

4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.

A 5-year-old toy poodle, Ginger, rules our household and allows me to live with her.

5.  What is your most precious memory?

After my wedding day, the day my publisher sent me an email saying attached is your contract.

6.  What is your most embarrassing memory?

At my high school prom I was up on a dais with my date after she had been crowned prom queen and in my haste to escape to the back of the stage, I knocked over a huge spotlight. Never had another date with that girl for some reason.

7.  If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

Probably working as a starving cartoonist.

8.  In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

Here lies Dave Webb, he loved his Lord, his wife, his life. The Nobel Prize for literature just happened along the way.

J. D. Webb the writer:

9.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

About 25 years ago when I received a check for $30 for a short story I submitted to a writing magazine.

10.  What is going on with your writing these days?

My third book Her Name Is Mommy came out in December and I'm about 90% through my next, a stand-alone called The Smudge. Here's the tag line: A small-town paralegal goes to her ATM machine one nasty night and wipes a smudge off the screen. It's blood.

I have two others started, one a western titled Rattler and the other is the third in my Mike Shepherd PI series called Aftermath.

11.  What are your future goals for your writing?

Just to keep at it, to keep improving and to keep getting feedback from readers saying they can't put it down.

12.  Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

Nope. I write when I can with no set routine except I try to get in 3 - 4 hours a day. That is except for Friday which is our date day, and Sunday which is my Sabbath.

13.  Why do you write?

I have no choice. I must write because these characters keep swirling around in my head yelling at me they want out. Please don't call my shrink.

14.  What writer most inspires you?  Why?

I can't pick out just one. I admire the masters who grab me and thrust me into their world. I want to kick the snot out of their bad guys and shake the hands of the protagonists and if my wife isn't looking, hug all the beautiful damsels.

15.  How do you define your writing?

I write cozy mysteries. I believe I can weave a suspenseful tale without all the vulgarity and excessive violence so prevalent today. There are murders and mayhem in my stories, I'm just not beating you over the head with them. And when sex happens it is inferred not explained.

16.  In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

He entertained and intrigued with a laugh or two along the way.

J. D.  Webb the details:

17.  Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

I'm not a blogger. I want to spend my time writing a story. My website is http://www.jdwebb.com/ where you can read the first chapters of all my books and even a short story when you visit.

18.  Is there a place where readers can reach you?

I love to hear from my readers. I treasure hearing from readers both what they liked and what they didn't like. Makes me a better writer. My email addy is: jdwebb99@yahoo.com

19.  Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

I'd better be able to do that.

Shepherd's Pie (Golden Wings Award winner)

Moon Over Chicago (2008 Eppie Finalist)

Her Name Is Mommy (Now available)

The Smudge (coming soon)

20.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

Always I try to make you laugh, cringe at my antagonists, pull for my protagonists, can't help but turn the page, and say at the end I didn't see that coming. My pledge is to improve my writing with each book.

In conclusion:

21.  Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

About me? I hope you've learned a little about me from this interview and my website. I love to have fun and tell stories.

About my writing? I hope you'll find everything in answer #20. My books are not lengthy and I don't dwell on description. A weapon may be identified but you won't get the entire history of that piece. I allow readers to use their imagination while reading my stories. You don't know much about my main character's looks because the story is coming from his or her point of view. You imagine who that person looks like. I've had people tell me that so-and-so should play Mike Shepherd in the movie (I should be so lucky). When that happens I seldom have that person in mind.

I pride myself in the fact that there is a twist at the end that you don't see coming. That's because until the end I have no idea how the book will turn out. All I ask is to give me a try. You just might like my stories.

Joyce it has been a pleasure to be interviewed by you. I love your different questions. I wish all happy reading.


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Thursday, 24 January 2008 4:47 PM EST
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Wednesday, 23 January 2008
Taking a Fun Meme Break
Topic: Miscellaneous

I've been meme'd by by Billie A. Williams of http://printedwords.blogspot.com

Here are the rules:

The Rules: Link to the person who tagged you. Post the rules on your blog. Share six non-important things/habits/quirks about yourself. Tag six random people at the end of your post by linking to their blogs. Let each random person know they have been tagged by leaving a comment on their website.

My problem is narrowing my quirks to six :-)

1.  When I was in kindergarten, I drove my teacher crazy and was told I was no longer allowed to "play house" because I insisted I had "five kids and no husband".

2.  I have times of "disassociation" when I'm stressed and "watch" myself going through the day.

3.  I have a genuine railroad crossing sign hanging on my living room wall.

4.  The favorite gift I ever received was a replica of the Groundhog Day groundhog that wiggles its butt as it sings "I'm All Right".  My son picked it out for one birthday because "Mama needs to laugh more".

5.  I surprise my son's friends because I not only know a lot about Pokemon--but also have my own Pokemon deck and can actually win games.

6.  My startle reflex is so sensitive I once counted and found I'd "jumped" for one reason or another 19 times in one day.  The ringing of a telephone or alarm clock has me shaking inside for nearly ten minutes.

 

Okay, that's done--I'm tagging:

Joyce Scarborough http://joycescarbrough.blogspot.com/

Phil Harris  http://philipharris.blog.com/

Dorien Grey  http://www.doriengrey.blogspot.com/

Jamieson Wolf http://www.jamiesonwolf.blogspot.com/

Tiffany Fitch http://www.xanga.com/neuroticfitchmom

Teri Brown http://tjbrown.blogspot.com/


Posted by joyceanthony at 1:39 AM EST
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Tuesday, 22 January 2008
Getting to Know Amber T. Kingston
Topic: Author Interview
Amber T. Kingston the person:

1. What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Quirky, Compassionate, and Generous

2.  How do you think others would describe you?

Loyal, Caring, and Giving.

3.   Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

Art. Drawing is the first thing I remember really falling in love with. My mother enrolled me in art classes when I was five and I've loved it ever since! Although I never went on to complete any other formal art education when I was older, it was something I continued to do in my free time at home.

4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.
 

I have two cats: Mouse and Geneva. Mouse is all-white with green eyes and is fairly quiet and reserved. Geneva is all-black with gold eyes and is talkative and rambunctious. Unfortunately, neither girl gets along with the other so we have to keep our home divided into two sections with a tall iron gate, giving each cat her run of part of the house.

5.  What is your most precious memory?

Building a "Square-foot Garden" with my grandfather in our back yard. It was very special and meant a lot to me to spend time alone with my grandfather. He acted as a father to me because I didn't have one. Our garden project was so important and fun for me. We grew radishes, carrots, tomatoes, corn, onions, and my favorite . . . sunflowers.

6.  What is your most embarrassing memory?

Forgetting to change my tights during the second act of a dance recital. I was the only girl on stage wearing white tights compared to the other girl's nude-colored legs. I was so panicked once I realized my mistake, that I also forgot the steps to the dance routine!

7.  If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

I would probably still be training to become an embalmer. I think the end of someone's life deserves as much care, dignity and respect as living part of it. Unfortunately, not many people want to be involved in the aspect of caring for the deceased. I imagine that soon I will find a balance between writing and becoming re-involved in the world of funeral care.

Amber T. Kingston the writer:

8.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

It was in my late twenties. I had been working on a young adult novel for 5 years, and had completed it at whopping 1100 pages. During that period I couldn't go anywhere without a pencil and my notebook-not even the movie theater!

9.   What is going on with your writing these days?

I'm currently working on my next book in the Laura series. After that, I have one more in mind. I'll be traveling to Germany to visit Laura this spring and I plan to take plenty of pictures of her to use as reference material this time! So right now it's all about writing the story, and then come springtime, I'll begin illustrating again.

10.  What are your future goals for your writing?

I'd like to revise and publish the young adult novel I began so long ago. Then I'd like to try writing in different genres to keep writing fresh and challenging for me. Fantasy for young adults comes to mind first, then perhaps a memoir.

11.   Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

I really don't have a typical writing day, but I probably should. Sometimes a write non-stop, sometimes I'll skip a day, some days are a combination of writing and drawing. It really varies and depends on my mood.

12.  Why do you write?

Writing makes me happy and I find a certain peace within it. It also allows me to connect to others in a way I'm comfortable with.

13.  What writer most inspires you?  Why?

When I was young, my favorite stories were by an author named Stephen Cosgrove. He had a series called the Serendipity books, which I still own today. I loved these stories and their colorful illustrations. Each book had a moral clearly stated at the end of it and I really liked that aspect as well.

14.  How do you define your writing?

I've never tried to define my writing before because I don't really think it can be done. I write about many different subjects in various forms. My first published book just happens to be a children's story. So right now, I'd say my writing is for families, the young, and young-at-heart. But overall, writing is simply an enjoyable craft that I can create for myself and others.

15.  In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

That they still have one dog-eared copy of one of my books in their house.

Amber T. Kingston the details:

16.  Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

You can visit my website at http://www.chrysalispress.com/. You can also read my blog on Amazon.com or myspace.com/ambertkingston.

17.  Is there a place where readers can reach you?

I always love to hear from my readers or anyone who simply has a question for me. I can be reached at amber@chrysalispress.com.

18.  Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

Laura and the Leprechauns by Amber T. Kingston

19.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

A fairytale adventure full of surprises and mischievous fun.

In conclusion:

20.  Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

Writing and drawing have been two of my greatest passions since early childhood. I hope that my stories and artwork bring enjoyment to those who embrace them, and I hope to encourage others who share my desire for creating, to pursue their dreams.


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Tuesday, 22 January 2008 12:05 AM EST
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Monday, 21 January 2008
Getting to Know Annette Snyder
Topic: Author Interview
Annette Snyder the person

1.  What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Loyal, Supportive, Colorful

2.  How do you think others would describe you?

Loyal, Supportive, Extremely Colorful

3.      Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

I find being a good person in a world that sometimes seems a little off edge is the best thing any person can accomplish.

4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.

I have a thirteen-year-old Weimaraner named Ginger.  She's got a beautiful brown coat (because she's mixed with a Chesapeake) and dark eyes.  She smiles when she sees me.  I also have a five-year-old mix between a Chihuahua and a Pomeranian named Snack, who, incidentally, also smiles when she sees me even though I find her personality a little harsh. And the neighbors Chihuahua, Teddy, squeezed through the gate last week and knocked her up. Anyone want a free puppy?

5.  What is your most precious memory?

There's so many, to pick one is impossible but, when I was very small, my grandfather would hoist me up in the air and tell me to hold out my arms.  He'd announce that I was his angel.  I was lucky enough to have him around until I was twelve.

6.  What is your most embarrassing memory?

There's so many, to pick just one is impossible!  I got a speeding ticket the other day on my way to take someone to the airport.  I had the day off from work and, while the cop had me stopped on the side of the road, my boss drove by.  The next day at work there were signs posted everywhere about me being a jailbird and where they were collecting bail money.

7.   If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

Laundry and dishes-maybe dusting.
 

8.      In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

I'm going to skip this question for personal reasons.  I will say that I want a giant beer party.  I want people to join together and remember the good things I did and the people I helped and loved.  Cry if you want, but don't cry forever.  It wastes precious laughing time.

Annette Snyder the writer:

9.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

When I woke up with an idea in my head about a story, wrote it down and it worked.  It surprised me that I could actually write an entire book. Then I wrote fifteen more and I knew.

10.  What is going on with your writing these days?

I've got publishers looking at two manuscripts, one book coming out in May, one just released last December and I'm writing an interesting novel where a woman's married lover is killed in a car accident and later she falls in love with a man whose wife was having an affair and was killed in a car accident.

11.  What are your future goals for your writing?

I'd like to be able to devote more attention to writing than I do.  My goal, and I rarely make goals, is to have more name recognition for my writing self by 2015.  That's ten years after the release of my first novel.

12.  Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

I get up at five in the morning and write for three hours before I go to work.  After work, I answer email and do my writing business.  On weekends, when I'm home cleaning and such, I try and write at least four hours a day.

13.  Why do you write?

I write to keep the bizarre dreams I usually have down to a minimum.  I mean, I dream of weird aliens that resemble Donald Duck and giant lizards terrorizing French restaurants-that sort of bizarre.  When I write, I sleep better.

14.  What writer most inspires you?  Why?

I love the way some authors write with the unexpected twists fit into the story but at the end of the novel, the whole premise of the plot changes.  Margaret Mitchell is my favorite author but I don't so much like the sequels to Gone with the Wind.  They just aren't the same.

15.  How do you define your writing?

Romantically comedic and adventurously real

16.  In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

Annette Snyder's timeless writing captures the heart of the nation with its realistic portrayal of midwestern life in small towns.

Annette Snyder the details:

17.  Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

http://annettesnyder.atspace.com/   http://www.growne.com/  http://www.whiskeycreekpress.com/  http://www.westernauthors.com/  http://mockingbird.creighton.edu/NCW/writers.htm

http://www.sewardchapters.com/

Plus google, mobi, fictionwise and affiliates, amazon and a lot more.

18.  Is there a place where readers can reach you?

I have a contact link at my website http://annettesndyer.atspace.com/ I also share a myspace with my firefighter hubby.  Just search the myspace accounts for ‘firefighter al' and I'll pop up.  My publisher Whiskey Creek Press also maintains a myspace page.

19.  Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

Sally Murphy, Liberty Road, Travis Pass, Rock Creek, Whiskey Shots Volume 1, Albert's Rain, Arpetta Honor-releasing May 2008

20.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

These published novels are historical/adventure/romance based at the turn of the century and during the Civil War periods. 

In conclusion:

21.  Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

I was fortunate to be born third generation American to immigrants who migrated to America from Czechoslovakia, Germany and France while they were very young. They started their families when they were fifteen and sixteen and, when I was young, my great grandparents were really old, but still of sound mind.  I sat for hours and listened to their stories of migration and growing up.  Visions of harsh blizzards and damaging locust swarms were probably terrible while they occurred, but I found the accounts to be fascinating.  I pictured my relatives conquering vast open plains on wagons towed by mismatched horses.  I sat enthralled when they told me stories of meeting Indians and how they traded for necessities. 

I paid attention to descriptions of staking shelter inside dark caves and caring for sick children--stories of survival in times when medicines, doctors and neighbors were miles away. 

While I listened to these ancient people recount their lives, I wondered how on earth anyone could survive during times when grocery stores were non-existent and maps only transpired between passersby and involved landmarks like rocks, trees and creek beds.  I wasn't sure why but I had a feeling, someday, all the information I learned would be useful and I needed to pay attention. 

Years later, my dearest friend told me the story of how her ancestors migrated to the Dakota's and I got the idea for Travis Pass, the first in my historical series.  Not true stories, by any means, but they contain elements of truth from rich history reports I listened to as a child. 

Readers tell me my characters are so well developed that they can't help but be caught up in my stories and they envision the struggles faced and the accomplishments gained. 


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Monday, 21 January 2008 4:14 AM EST
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Sunday, 20 January 2008
Getting to Know Greg Babic
Topic: Author Interview

Don't forget to check out Greg's very special gift at the end of his interview!!

Greg Babic (Gregory Victor Babic), the person:

1.  What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Caring, thoughtful, and honest.

2.  How do you think others would describe you?

Loving, intelligent, and loyal.

3.  Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

Family, lifelong learning, teaching, mentoring, reading, going to the movies, studying the geodesic dome form, creating hand-made games and puzzles, and being a good friend.

4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.

"Princess Mischka B. Babic" is our beautiful, yellow, pure-bred Labrador puppy, who only came into our lives just over a year ago and who has already become an irreplacable member of the family. Mischka demands nothing but love and affection, and gives it back one-hundred-fold (no lie). I can honestly say that she has totally changed my life in the last twelve months!

5.  What is your most precious memory?

Christmas 1975: when I was 12 years old and got a Remington portable manual typewriter (a keyboard that prints, for those of you too young to remember "typewriters"), including a snazzy little leather zip-up cover. I thought it was the best present I ever received (and still do). Mind you, Joyce, Mum and Dad did not make it easy for me to guess what I was getting that day, believe me - because they put it at the bottom of an empty refrigerator box, which they then filled with crumpled up newspapers, so that, as I desperately pulled out balled-up-paper after balled-up-paper, I had no idea at all what I was going to find at the bottom of the box. All I remember is that, when I finally pulled out the zippered object and opened it, I cried with all my heart - because it was exactly what I had wanted. Sadly, though, I no longer have that (or any) typewriter; but it doesn't matter, because I will never, ever forget the day I got it - and how much it meant to me!

6.  What is your most embarrassing memory?

Telling my future sister-in-law, on her Wedding Day (when she was going to marry my oldest brother), that she "scrubbed up all right" (an endearing Australian expression, isn't it?). Sadly, she later divorced my brother - although I have been assured that my tactlessness played no part!

7.  If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

Teaching and Learning - Always.

8.   In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

Loving husband (hopefully one day), father (hopefully one day), son, brother, uncle, and, most of all, friend (to many); Greg will be remembered always for his compassion, helpfulness, and thoughtfulness. Although sadly missed, his books will always remind us of him.

Greg Babic (Gregory Victor Babic), the writer:

9.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

This would have been when I won the "University of Sydney Union Literary Competition - Prose Section" in my first year at university (1982). Although I had been writing by that time for nearly a decade, it was the first time that I had received external validation. I did not complete my second year of university until much later (1988), however - but I felt validated again when I won the "Henry Lawson Prize for Prose" (administered by the University of Sydney) that time around.

10.  What is going on with your writing these days?

I'm not sure where to start Joyce... I have only just received an email (January 15, 2008) from Amazon.com advising me that my young adult novel, "The Profile", has been selected as a Semi-Finalist in the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award Contest (I would be delighted if readers would download, read, and then review the excerpt here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0011G9XZ0) - and I am definitely extremely excited about that (especially as this will be my first published work of fiction, after three non-fiction books). Also, my third book, "Words to Inspire Writers" (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0980372208), has just been published (January 1, 2008) by F. C. Sach & Sons, Publishers (an extensive sampler can be downloaded from here: http://fcsachandsonspublishers.com/sampler/), so that is something else to be thankful for. Finally, I am compiling my short stories into a collection that will hopefully be published later in the year. All in all, I would say that 2008 is turning into the best year ever for my writing!

11.  What are your future goals for your writing?

Specific goals would obviously include seeing my young adult novel, "The Profile", published soon, as well as my first Short Story collection - and then working on increasing my online presence as a Writer. Whatever direction I take, however, I just know that Writing is always going to be a part of my life.

12.  Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

I do not have typical writing days, per se: I tend to write when the spirit moves me (so to speak). I might find myself chained to the keyboard for hours (and sometimes days) when I am consumed by a story, or an article, or a chapter, or whatever; but then I experience days, even weeks, when I cannot write at all. "Words to Inspire Writers" (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0980372208) grew out of an attempt to beat my own Writer's Block and I hope it will be just as helpful (and motivating) for other writers caught in a black hole.

13.  Why do you write?

I write because my imagination forces me to: it seeks an outlet. Words, therefore, become an expression of my wide-ranging thoughts and often intense feelings.

14.  What writer most inspires you?  Why?

You know, Joyce, this is a really hard question to answer. I love to read. I read voraciously and across all genres (in both fiction and non-fiction). And my tastes definitely change over time and depending upon my circumstances. I grew up devouring science fiction (the old masters, like Heinlein, Asimov, Clarke, Simak, etc.), moved to fantasy (Tolkien, Lewis, Norton, and others), but then switched to horror (King, Koontz, Rice, Barker, Straub, to start with), where I dwelled for many years. I discovered non-fiction when completing my Bachelor of Arts degree, and later my Postgraduate Diploma in Secondary Education, and will today try basically anything non-fiction that catches my eye (lately this has included Carl Sagan, Richard Dawkins, Christopher Hitchens, and John Grogan, as a sampling from my shelves show). Today I have so many contemporary (fiction) writers that I admire (like Gene Brewer, Jeremy Robinson, Tess Gerritsen, Jonathan Kellerman, James Patterson, Stephen Hunter, Robert B Parker, Michael Crichton, Elmore Leonard, David Morrell, Douglas Preston, Dean R Koontz, Donald E Westlake, Lincoln Child, Tom Clancy, Dan Brown, Thomas Harris, Steve Alten, and John Sandford - to name only some of them[?]), and, in a totally different vein, classic authors too (like James A Michener, Louis L'Amour, and Ayn Rand, to name just an eclectic few), but the one person writing today I probably most admire, and relate to, is the young Australian thriller writer, Matthew Reilly (and, especially, his Shane Schofield character, the "Scarecrow"). Matthew writes like no one I have ever read before; his prose positively sparkling with energy and pace. I have never devoured pages as quickly as I have when reading his books (and I read them many, many times too!). Each story is so cinematic, it awaits only the transfer to film (that I feel certain will come one day). I also admire the chutzpah Matthew showed in self-publishing his first novel, and then hawking it through Sydney booksellers - where it was noticed and picked up for republishing by a traditional publisher. Well done, Matthew. And, believe it or not, he seems to really know the universal struggle writers face better than many other writers I have read, as he exhorts, in each of his books, "To anyone who knows a writer, never underestimate the power of your encouragement..." I will automatically buy any one of his novels as they come out, because I think he is such an enjoyable read! But again, Joyce, please remember what I said: I just love to read, and will generally give any writer recommended to me a chance (regardless of genre).

15.  How do you define your writing?

Eclectic, in a word. My first three books have all been non-fiction, but my lifelong passion has been to create narratives (whether in novel, screenplay, or short story form), and I still hope to bring many of these unpublished works to market one day.

16.  In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

Greg Babic was someone who tried to make a difference through his writing - teaching and entertaining always.

Greg Babic (Gregory Victor Babic), the details:

17.  Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

My website can be found at http://gregbabic.com/ and it does include an occasional blog post, but blogging is totally new to me and the posts to date are few and far between (something I do hope to work on in the future).

18.  Is there a place where readers can reach you?

The best way to contact me directly is via http://gregbabic.com/contact/ (where you will find my email address in graphic form - to foil the spam spiders crawling the Net!).

19.  Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

My first book came about when I was teaching in greater metropolitan Sydney high schools. Convinced that students of all ages could achieve whatever they set their minds to, with the right guidance and encouragement, I wrote Study Success Know-How: A 1,001-Point Action Checklist Designed To Help You Take Control Of Your Learning And Maximise Your Achievement Potential - Immediately! (2nd Edition currently available from Five Senses Education, ISBN 1-876932-19-8). My second book, Film Study Terms: A glossary of key concepts related to the study of Film, followed (also from Five Senses Education, ISBN 1-876932-97-X), allowing any student of Film to better understand the language of Film Study. My third book, a brand new motivational compilation for Writers (1,100 Quotations from over 300 Authors!), titled Words to Inspire Writers: A perpetual Calendar of classic Writing-related Quotations - on Writers, Writing, Words, Books, Literature, and Publishing - specifically selected to illustrate the Writing Process and to motivate Authors every day (ISBN 978-0-980372-20-5), has just been published by F. C. Sach & Sons, Publishers (http://fcsachandsonspublishers.com/) and is now available for purchase from Amazon.com(http://www.amazon.com/dp/0980372208), other online booksellers, or through bookstores everywhere (via Ingram Book Group).

20.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

My three published works - all non-fiction - provide readers with answers to specific problems (as in, for instance, how to study successfully, how to understand the language of Film Study, and how writers can motivate themselves every day and, hopefully, overcome Writer's Block as a result). My fiction - as it comes to market in the future - will showcase my diverse interests, my caring nature, and my passionate devotion to telling a good story (whatever the genre).

In conclusion:

21.  Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

Now you've truly stumped me, Joyce. What do I want people to know about me and my writing? How about, "That my writing is genuine - it comes from my heart and soul - and it generally has something special and unique to say." The most important message I would like to share with any other writer in the world (of any age, in any culture, writing in any language), by way of encouragement and support, is that "Your Message Matters (whatever it might be) - to Someone, Somewhere." Everything you write has value (in one form or another)! To help spread that message, Joyce, I would be absolutely delighted to send a pdf copy of a wonderfully whimsical fable I wrote, called "The Novelist and the Nightingale", to any of your readers who emails me with "Joyce Anthony Special Offer" in the Subject line. It's a little tale I am quite proud of (which will be included in my upcoming short story collection) and your readers will be the first to read it anywhere in the World (I promise that it will not appear anywhere else before it ends up in the printed compilation)!

Just before I finish up Joyce, may I please take this opportunity to say how much I have truly enjoyed being interviewed for your website. The experience has been enlightening and helpful. It has allowed me to think carefully about myself - as a writer - and also about my readers (where-ever they might be). Thank you also for letting me spread the news about my books with your loyal readers. To me, there is nothing more generous that a writer can do to help another writer! Again, thank you.


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Sunday, 20 January 2008 12:27 AM EST
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Saturday, 19 January 2008
Getting to Know Kam Ruble
 Kam Ruble the person:

1.  What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Compassionate

Dependable

Honest

2.  How do you think others would describe you?

Others would describe me as generous to a fault. When I am aware of someone in need, I will do my best to help them - even if I have to do without. Many have told me they did not like me upon first meeting as they thought I was haughty. When in reality it is my inferiority-complex that gives that terrible first impression about me. Once people get to know me, they realize how very personable I am.

3.  Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

Outside of writing, I would have to say my next passion is singing. I believe the art of selling a song has made me a better writer. Like writing, being a stage performer is very addictive. Once it gets in your blood, it is difficult to ignore.

4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.

I don't know if I have pets or they have me. With both a Maltese dog and a Siamese cat in our household, they rule the roost. My Maltese, Gunny, will be nine on January 31. He's a loveable little fella whom I've raised since he was six weeks old. Moka joined our family at age six months; he will be four this year. For those who don't know, Maltese have white fur. Not dog hair. They are not supposed to shed, but my dark clothes would disagree. Moka, a Lilac Point Tiger, isn't quite so loveable. He enjoys being pet on his terms. The guys don't fight, but Moka loves to tease Gunny. Both are inside animals, both are spoiled rotten, and neither will go to bed unless they can snuggle up to me on my waterbed.

5.  What is your most precious memory?

It is impossible for me to say I have only one precious memory. Why? Because I have three daughters. My precious memories stem from the first times I held each one of my newborns in my arms.

6.  What is your most embarrassing memory?

Throughout my lifetime, I have had many embarrassing moments. The first one that comes to mind was when I was modeling. I was walking the catwalk in a gorgeous, black lace, designer dress when a heel broke off my 3-inch heels, sending me tumbling to the floor. The worse part was the way I landed, dress hiked almost to my waist and not wearing any undergarments. And, 99% of the audience were men who were there shopping for their sweetheart's Valentine's gift.

7.      If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

I would probably go back to school to further my education and become a pre-marriage counselor if I wasn't writing. Too many people rush into marriage without fully understanding the commitment. I know, I have been one of them. And, unfortunately, few seek marriage counseling when problems start. Although I think marriage counseling is wonderful, I also believe couples should go through pre-marital counseling to help ward off many problems before the vows have been taken.

8.      In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

Kam, beloved mother, grandmother, and friend.

Kam Ruble the writer:

9.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

I realized I had finally arrived as an author the day I signed my first book contract. Even though my husband's name was shown as author on the final published work, it was my work and my name on the contract.

10.  What is going on with your writing these days?

Presently, I am in the process of writing "Black Iris: Have No Mercy V". Also, I am working with my publisher, Kathleen Walls (Global Authors Publications), and illustrator, T.C. McMullen (Star Publish) in completing "Princess Annado Tandy's Versery-Rhymes Book Two. Hopefully, both books will be released in fall of 2008.

11.  What are your future goals for your writing?

After the release of the two books I am presently working on, Book Three of ‘Annado' will be my priority for 2009. Other than that, I will leave my writing up to the story characters in my head. If they need to be heard from, another book or books will be written.

12.  Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

Since I am retired, I have no set time for writing. My best hours, however, are from 7:00 p.m. until 9:00 a.m. the next morning. No TV. No phone calls. No interruptions. After booting my computer, I start playing background music. I can spend from 1 hour to 14 hours at my computer, writing. When I do, I have 3 windows open: document of the manuscript I am working on; document of the characters, their descriptions, and roles in the storyline; and, solitaire. When I draw a blank, or need to think about how to express what's in my mind to words on paper, I play solitaire. Concentrating on the game gives me a whole new perspective when I go back to writing. If I sit writing for long periods of time, I am constantly exercising so my body doesn't stiffen up on me. And, on the days I spend long hours writing, I start off with a cup of chocolate latte'. Then have nothing more for the rest of the day until I eat dinner. When I write during the nighttime hours, generally a can of Pepsi will sustain me until my morning latte'. I believe a healthy body and a healthy mind go together as a hand and glove.

13,  Why do you write?

I write because of several reasons. Writing is fun. Writing keeps my mind active. I love to tell stories that people enjoy reading. And, once I started writing, an abundance of characters moved into the creative cells of my brain. Many of them won't let me rest until I tell their story.

14.  What writer most inspires you?  Why?

Sadly, I don't read. I was always afraid someone would say I copied another author's work or style. The other reason I don't read is dealing with dyslexia.

15.  How do you define your writing?

For my mysteries, I would define my writing as easy to read, intriguing, and enough twists to keep the reader interested. In my children's books, I would define my writing as colorful and fun reading.

16.  In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

In her time, Kam was a great story teller.

Kam Ruble the details:

17.  Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

One can read more about my books and me at http://www.blueleafpub.com/kamruble ;

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw/105-8360030-1988449?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=Kam+Ruble&x=10&y=28  ; and,

http://www.fictionwise.com/eBooks/KamRubleeBooks.htm

18.  Is there a place where readers can reach you?

I love hearing from my readers. They can reach me by email at: kam_ruble@yahoo.com.

19.  Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

PAPERBACKS:

a.  Have No Mercy   (listed as Bobby Ruble, author - for which I was the ghost writer). This book is only available by: 1) Purchasing a new copy direct through me; or, 2) Purchasing a used copy from bookstores.

b.  Black Rosebud: Have No Mercy II

c.  Black Lily: Have No Mercy III

d.  Black Tulip: Have No Mercy IV

e.  Stitchers and Bitchers

f.  Princess Annado Tandy's Versery-Rhymes

EBOOKS

a.  The Dawg Who Saved Christmas

b.  Dawg Eyes: Still Top Dog

c.  Dawg Catches Rat

20.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

New readers can expect to be entertained when they read my books.

In conclusion:

21.  Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

The only times I find it necessary to do research for my books is when I want to make sure I get details correct when it comes to law enforcement procedures. Other than that, the storyline for my books come from dreams I have had, or something in my head (like a character) that triggers a story just begging to be written. I enjoy putting twists and turns in my mysteries to keep the reader guessing. As for my children's books, I enjoy telling a story especially if it is based on a learning curve. And, I write my children's books so all ages (1 to 101) will enjoy reading them and get attached to my adorable characters.


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Saturday, 19 January 2008 12:12 AM EST
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Friday, 18 January 2008
Getting to Know Annette Gisby

Annette Gisby the person:

1. What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Shy, anxious, kind.

2. How do you think others would describe you?

I really have no idea how I seem to other people! I'm quite shy in real life as opposed to writing, so that probably comes across.

3. Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.

Reading and spending time with my husband, John.

4. Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.

None at all, unless you count the collection of over on hundred cuddly toys, mostly penguins and bunny rabbits with the odd teddy bear thrown in for good measure.

5. What is your most precious memory?

The day John proposed to me while we were on holiday in Portugal. It was my twentieth birthday and he gave me a porcelain bridgroom doll in a top hat and tails which was holding a little bag with a piece of paper in it. Inside was a poem, with the last line to be spoken out loud, which John did on bended knee, "Will you marry me?". It was very romantic. I still get a soppy smile on my face when I think about it!


6. What is your most embarrassing memory?

Always getting picked last for sports teams at school. I was hopeless at sports, I'm not athletic at all.


7. If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

Probably running a bookshop or a travel agency.

 
8. In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

The library and the book shops will miss her dearly.

Annette Gisby the writer:

9. Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

When I'd finished my first novel and typed the words "The End" on it. Even if I never got it published, I'd written a book and for me that was quite an achievement.


10. What is going on with your writing these days?

I haven't been very well health wise lately so my novel writing has fallen by the wayside a little, but I'm keeping in practice by writing fanfic. It's mostly Harry Potter fanfic these days, but I have also written X-Files and Lord of the Rings as well. I did the National Novel Writing month in November, which was quite a struggle, but I did manage to get past the 50,000 word count. Of course, that one is nowhere near ready for publication yet! It's a fantasy novel called The Chosen which I do hope to get published some time later this year. I'm also working on another suspense novel called "Shutterspeed", again with my health not being the best, my original muse has not been working well these days.


11. What are your future goals for your writing?

I would love to be able to earn enough so that John could give up his job so he could write full time. Then we could both live wherever we wanted. That place would probably be New Zealand.

12. Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

I normally wake up, check my emails and things like that. Then I have breakfast before starting any writing. I seem to write better when I'm not hungry, LOL! I write a bit of fanfic in the mornings for an hour or so, then switch to some original stuff. Some days I will be researching things either for my fanfic stories, original novels or for my newsletter, which I try to put out every month but sometimes it doesn't work out like that!

I do the housework and cooking in the afternoons, then a bit more writing and surfing before John gets home and we have dinner together. John normally uses the computer at night, but he got me a mini-laptop, so we can both write at the same time now!



13. Why do you write?

Because if I didn't I'd go mad! There are all these stories and characters in my head that just don't go away until I've written them down.


14. What writer most inspires you?  Why?

There are a few, not just one. They would be Stephen King who writes great stories without lots of flowery language, Sheri. S. Tepper, who writes wonderful SF stories which don't get too bogged down in lots of technical detail at the expense of the story. Barbara Wood who always has strong heroines, Lyn Flewlling whose work inspired me to try my hand at writing fantasy.


15. How do you define your writing?

It tells a story. I tend to write quite fast moving stories, you won't find a lot of extraneous description in my books, LOL! I think of myself as a storyteller first and foremost.

16. In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

That was a brilliant story.


Annette Gisby the details:

17. Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog?

My main website is http://www.annettegisby.n3.net
For fanfic (under the pen name Eriador117) http://www.hpfandom.net/eff/viewuser.php?uid=898
My newsletter blog: http://community.livejournal.com/roseshadows/

My fanfic is more explicit than my books, and most of it contains slash relationships, male/male usually.

18. Is there a place where readers can reach you?

They can email me at annette.gisby@which.net

19. Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them?

Silent Screams (novel)
Shadows of the Rose (short story and novella collection)
Drowning Rapunzel (novel)
New Zealand with a Hobbit Botherer written with John Gisby (humour/travel)


20.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?

I hope they'll find an interesting story with sympathetic characters. There's usually a bit of romance as well, but I don't think they fall into any one particular genre. I read lots of different genres, so I tend to write them as well! Or even combine a few :)

In conclusion:

21. Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing?

When not writing or reading, I can be found playing The Sims2 on my computer, which can be quite an addictive wee game. It's almost like playing virtual doll houses. I sometimes try creating characters from my books in the Sims to see how they might look as an illustration. Despite being female, I'm also quite a fan of gadgets and I play RPG (role playing games) on Playstation2. It took me about 140 hours to finally fnish Dragon Quest and I'm still working on Final Fantasy XII along with Suikoden V. I'll be quite some time I think! Supposedly, you're meant to like them more if you're male. I play them a lot more than John does!

I like to travel to different places, even though I get very travel sick. I've even been sick on a bicycle! I find different places help spark imagination, especially walking along deserted beaches or in woods. I love the sea, but not being in a boat on the sea.

We went twice to New Zealand on holiday and loved it so much we'd really like to live there.

And if any readers would like to try a bit of my work before deciding if my style is right for them, I've got a free ebook sampler (PDF) here:
http://www.lulu.com/content/20706


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Thursday, 17 January 2008 11:02 PM EST
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Thursday, 17 January 2008
Getting to Know Alan Toback
Topic: Author Interview

Alan Tobak the person:

1. What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

A. Caring .
B. Loving .
C. Intelligent
.

2.  How do you think others would describe you?

I think people would describe me as a sensitive, warm person
that makes people smile.


3.   Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of
writing.

My wife, of course . She has made my life worth living,  has
gotten me out of serious depression, and allows me to love her
and writing.


4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them.

Not yet .


5.  What is your most precious memory?

When I first met my wife, Mary, online, she had a way of
capturing my interest that intrigued me. I just had to find out
about her.



6.  What is your most embarrassing memory?

When I feel down the steps of wedding platform while trying to
break the wedding cup.  (Don't ask).

7.  If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your
life?

 Having depression from divorce, and a handicapped son, I
probably would not be alive.



Alan Toback the writer:

8.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a
"real" writer?

When the world around me became a story line no matter where I
was at the time. I now see life around me, blossoming into
stories, poetry and amazement.

9.  What is going on with your writing these days?

I am writing poetry and trying to finish a very long short story
I started 3 yrs. Ago.


10. What are your future goals for your writing?

To keep on writing till I no longer can think.

11. Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

My life is anything but typical . I am disabled having a stroke
in '77, heart blockage now and various other serious illnesses.
But when the muse hits, I take advantage of it as quickly as
possible. I do have a problem with 'pushing myself' to write,
but this New Year promised myself to do better.

12. Why do you write?

That's like asking; Why do you love? . I write because it wants
to be read. My mind never sleeps or slows down. That's why it's
had to sleep at night
.

13. What writer most inspires you?  Why?

A.  Shakespeare .B.    He was so prolific in so many genre's,
poetry, short stores ,etc.


14. How do you define your writing?

It has a little of myself in it, passion . interest . mystery.
My poetry is inspired by my wife and new religious aspect of my
life.

15. In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your
writing in fifty years?

He was inspired late in life, but his maturity had a youthful
edge to it. He wrote poetry in Free Verse because it was his
mind's view of life. He wrote because it gave him pleasure to
give others pleasure.


Alan Toback the details:

16. Can you tell us where to find more information on you?
Website?  Blog?

Just Google . alan m. toback

17. Is there a place where readers can reach you?

Museitup club

18. Can you list all your book titles so people can look for
them?

"Before the last teardrop falls ", "The Muse On Writing"

19.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your
book(s)?

Poetry . with a heart.

In conclusion:

20. Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what
would you like them to know about you and your writing?

I have been married twice (counting present one) and in each one
have learned that life is what you put into it, not what you
take away. I have searched each day for true love, yet found
that my heart had it all the time. Mary saw this and pulled it
out for us to share.

She has helped me in my writing, being my editor and
encouragement. I left high school @ age 16, yet recently took
college classes in creative writing, getting awards from
college. Mary helps me with my grammar and proofreads some, yet
holds down a full time employment.


Posted by joyceanthony at 12:01 AM EST
Updated: Thursday, 17 January 2008 12:14 AM EST
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Wednesday, 16 January 2008
Getting to Know Sheila Crosby
Topic: Author Interview
Sheila Crosby the person

1.      What three words do you think describe you as a human being?

Kind, opinionated and disorganised.

2.  How do you think others would describe you?

My best friend describes me as a saint, but I know better.  And recently someone I thought was a friend made it obvious that she sees me as a complete idiot.  So I guess they all have different opinions.

3.  Please tell us what you are most passionate about outside of writing.  

My family, and keeping the planet habitable for my son.  C'mon guys.  It really wouldn't kill you to turn stuff off when you're not using it.

4.  Do you have any pets?  If so, introduce us to them. 

We have two black cats, called Inky and Bib.  For some mysterious feline reason, Inky follows me around and Bib follows my husband. 

5.  What is your most precious memory? 

My son's birth of course.  But my first fiction sale runs it pretty close. 

6.  What is your most embarrassing memory? 

I'm not going to tell you because it's far too embarassing!


7.  If you weren't a writer, what would you be doing with your life?

Getting very frustrated.

8.  In two paragraphs or less write your obituary.

She spent the first forty-five years of her life flitting between projects like a butterfly.  Then she pulled her finger out and started writing a book a year for the rest of her life.  And the quality just kept getting better and better.

Sheila Crosby the writer:

9.  Can you describe the time you realized you were indeed a "real" writer?

When I got my first acceptance for a paying market. I got the email at work, so I went into the ladies so I could jump up and down in private.


10.  What is going on with your writing these days?

I'm writing my first novel, a whodunnit set in the astronomical observatory in the Canary Islands where I used to work.  It would probably go faster if I could give up short stories, but every now and then one sort of bursts out.

11.  What are your future goals for your writing?

To earn enough money to give up other paid work and employ a cleaner, so I can WRITE.

12.  Can you describe a typical writing day for you?

I drop my son off at school at 8:30 a.m. then come home and do about an hour's housework, before I sit down at the computer.  I read my email, and start work at about 10 a.m.  Around 11:30 I have a break from writing to do a bit more housework.  I usually produce my daily word quota before I have to pick my son up from school at 1:30 p.m, but I frequently go back to the computer in the afternoon to do a bit more, or to submit a short story.  The rest of the day seems to vanish, mostly on stuff like cooking and cleaning.

13.  Why do you write? 

I have two main reasons.  The noble one is that I want to be a weapon of mass construction, by making people wiser and/or happier.  The less nobel one is  to make people miss their stop on the train and burn their dinner.  I think at some level I'm just writing "Sheila woz here" on the toilet wall of life.

14.  What writer most inspires you?  Why? 

Terry Pratchett.  I started reading him for the humour, which I still love.  But now I love the profound observation of human nature even more.  Like the people charging into battle yelling, "Remember the atrocity committed four hundred years ago which justifies the atrocity we're going to commit today!"  You look at the Middle East or the Balkans, and you see it's so true that it makes your toes curl. I also love Ursula LeGuin.  Both the discword and Earthsea feel like places I've been on holiday.  I'd love to be able to do that.

15.  How do you define your writing? 

Quirky.

16.  In one sentence-what do you want people to say about your writing in fifty years?

" I like Sheila's stories so much that I'm saving a few of them for when I'm going through a rough patch."

Sheila Crosby the details:

17.  Can you tell us where to find more information on you? Website?  Blog? 

My main website is http://sheilacrosby.com,

and my blog is http://sheilacrosby.blogspot.com

Please visit!

18.  Is there a place where readers can reach you?

Via my website.

19.  Can you list all your book titles so people can look for them? 

I've sold lots of short stories, but no books yet.  You can see a full bibliography at http://sheilacrosby.com/publications.php

20.  For new readers-what can they expect when they read your book(s)?   

Funny little black marks on dead trees.  Quirky entertainment with plenty of surprises and hopefully a few belly laughs.

In conclusion:

21.  Take as much space as necessary to speak to our readers-what would you like them to know about you and your writing? 

I'm British, but I live on a small Spanish island off the coast of Morocco.  I originally came here to work at the astronomical observatory at the top of the mountain here, so I know the setting of my whodunnit really well.  That job lasted 11 years before I was downsized, by which time I'd aquired a local husband and a son.  I taught English for a while, but when my Dad died, I could afford to stop.  Since my son needed more attention and my novel was going nowhere, I did stop.  I've never been happier, even if I am doing my own cleaning again.

 

 

 


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